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More Information and Recent Research on Stress

(Science Daily) A new poll released [in July] that examines the role of stress in Americans' lives finds that about half of the public (49 percent) reported that they had a major stressful event or experience in the past year. Nearly half (43 percent) reported that the most stressful experiences related to health.
(University of Michigan) A fear of finance-related challenges for people suffering with chronic diseases may be just as detrimental to their health management as actual out-of-pocket costs, a new study shows… Participants reported fears about exceeding coverage, gaps in coverage, the variability in covered asthma therapies, and a number of administrative challenges associated with insurance management. This occurred with both private and public insurance.
(Science Daily) Journalists working with images of extreme violence submitted to newsrooms by the public are at increased risk of adverse psychological consequences, including post-traumatic stress disorder. "Given that good journalism depends on healthy journalists, news organizations will need to look anew at what can be done to offset the risks inherent in viewing material. Reducing the frequency of exposure may be one way to go," authors say.
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found having at least one civilian stressor or a reported incident of sexual harassment during deployment raised the odds of alcohol use disorders.
(The People’s Pharmacy) A pilot study at the Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs hospital taught vets stress reduction techniques… After three months of home practice, the veterans' management of their diabetes had improved significantly. Their HbA1c, a marker of blood sugar control, had dropped from 8.3 to 7.3 on average. The investigators were pleasantly surprised that veterans who had been skeptical at first found that this new approach worked so well.
(Science Daily) Workplace stress can have a range of adverse effects on health with an increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in the first line. However, to date, convincing evidence for a strong association between work stress and incident Type 2 diabetes mellitus is missing. Researchers have now discovered that individuals who are under a high level of pressure at work face an about 45 percent higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who are subjected to less stress at their workplace.
More . . .
People Asked A Stress Psychologist Just About Everything On Reddit
(Shots, NPR) On Friday, Dr. Lynn Bufka, a licensed psychologist with expertise in treating anxiety and stress, came to NPR to answer questions online about coping with stress. Here are some highlights.
(The Atlantic) Toiling away for more hours diminishes productivity. Why do so many do it anyway?
(Science Daily) Anyone who’s had a pimple form right before an important event may wonder if stress caused the break out. While commonly linked anecdotally, proving the relationship between stress and inflammatory skin conditions, such as acne, psoriasis and rosacea, is another matter. An expert discusses the latest research on the impact stress has on inflammatory skin conditions and his thoughts on how this research could change treatment options.
(Florida International University) When traditional methods of treatment do not work for children suffering from anxiety disorders, researchers at FIU believe they have found another option… Ph.D. student Michele Bechor and Psychology Professor Jeremy Pettit decided to try attention bias modification treatment for these children, a computer-based method that seems more like a video game to kids than therapy. The computers help train the children to direct their attention away from threatening stimuli toward non-threatening stimuli.
(Scientific American) The new identification of possible genetic markers for post-traumatic stress disorder supports treatment with a steroid hormone a few hours after trauma.
(Reuters Health) The next addition to the collection of health apps coming online for smartphones may be a stress test, researchers said at a recent conference.
(Arizona State University) [A research team found] that "negative experiences are more readily remembered when an event is traumatic enough to release cortisol after the event, and only if norepinephrine is released during or shortly after the event." "This study provides a key component to better understanding how traumatic memories may be strengthened in women," Segal added, "because it suggests that if we can lower norepinephrine levels immediately following a traumatic event, we may be able to prevent this memory enhancing mechanism from occurring, regardless of how much cortisol is released following a traumatic event."
(Arizona State University) New research by clinical psychologists from Arizona State University and the United Kingdom has revealed seizures that could be mistaken for epilepsy are linked to feelings of anxiety. The team of researchers devised a new set of tests to determine whether there was a link between how people interpret and respond to anxiety, and incidences of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES)… "PNES can be a very disabling condition, and it is important that we understand the triggers so that we provide the correct care and treatment," said Lian Dimaro, a clinical psychologist based at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, who served as lead researcher for the study.
(Science Daily) Epigenetic changes to a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain reacts to threats, according to a new study. The results may explain how the well-understood serotonin transporter leaves some individuals more vulnerable than others to stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders.
Community: There are many practical things we can do to reduce stress.

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