A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

Male Menopause Affects More Than Five Million Men

(Science Daily) While most frequently associated with women's health, age-related hormone changes, often dubbed menopause, can occur in men as well, causing symptoms of fatigue, mood swings, decreased desire for sex, hair loss, lack of concentration and weight gain. Experts estimate that more than 5 million men are affected, yet worry the number may be considerably higher since symptoms are frequently ignored…

"This is a highly prevalent disorder," said Robert Brannigan, MD, urologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. "Unfortunately, we estimate that 95 percent of cases are undiagnosed and therefore untreated. When ignored, symptoms can seriously disrupt one's quality of life."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Study Finds Even a Little Cigarette Smoke Harms Airway

(HealthDay News) A drag from a cigarette now and then can't hurt, right?

Wrong, according to a new study that finds even low levels of smoke exposure can cause irreparable damage to cells essential to breathing.

The damage occurred among "casual" smokers and even after exposure to secondhand smoke. The initial damage, while not usually severe, can be cumulative and prolonged exposure to tobacco smoke could lead to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and even lung cancer, the researchers reported.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Yoga may help mood, decrease anxiety

(UPI) Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine say they found a connection between yoga and levels of a neuro-transmitter called gamma-aminobutyric. Increased gamma-aminobutyric availability is linked to greater relaxation, less anxiety and anti-convulsive effects.

The study findings … indicate those who practice yoga report greater decreases in anxiety and more improvement in mood than those who walked.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Adding Fish Oil to Low-Fat/High-Carb Diet May Improve Cholesterol

(HealthDay News) For people with the metabolic syndrome -- a cluster of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high levels of blood fats or triglycerides and high blood sugar -- adding a little fish oil to a diet low in saturated fats and high in complex carbohydrates might be just the ticket, a new study suggests.

"When you add omega-3 to a high carbohydrate, low-fat diet, you can prevent the long-term adverse effect that a high-carbohydrate diet induces on [blood fats]," said study author Dr. Jose Lopez-Miranda, a professor of medicine.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

A New Way to Choose Healthy Foods

(Reader’s Digest) In addition to listing ingredients, food is required to have nutritional information labeling. But what do these nutrition facts really tell us about the health value of a food? A new system created by Yale scientist Dr. David Katz and a panel of experts hopes to cut through the food industry's highly successful marketing of unhealthy snack foods. NuVal is a 1-100 based system that weighs 30-plus nutrients and nutrition factors. Good nutrients like fiber raise the score, while the not-so-good, like trans fats and excess sugar, lower the score.

As Katz says in this clip from CNNMoney.com, most produce will have a score between 90-100. We know produce is healthy. The other foods that are labeled to get us to think they are healthy are what NuVal targets…

Plus:
15 Foods You Should Never Buy Again
13 Things Your Supermarket Isn't Telling You

Read more.

Community: I have an even easier system—I shop mostly on the edges of the store: produce, dairy (low- and non-fat only), and frozen sections. If I buy anything from the middle of the store, I check the contents carefully.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Recipes

Cooking Light:

Grilled Chicken with Fresh Grape Glaze
Grapes are probably the last thing you'd think of to put on grilled chicken, but combined with soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, and rosemary, they really work well here. Their natural sugars caramelize during cooking, giving the finished dish the charred crust that makes grilled food great.

Mango Rice Salad with Grilled Shrimp
Asian influences are rather uncommon at the summer table, but with curry-marinated shrimp, coconut-tinged rice, crunchy vegetables, and distinctively flavored mango, this dish will change that, and fast.

Help! I'm Drowning in Zucchini!
Zucchini and other summer squashes are abundant in backyard gardens, farmers' markets, and grocery stores this time of year. Try these recipes to use up your supply.

Sautéed Baby Squash with Basil and Feta

Sautéed Escarole, Corn, and White Bean Salad

Summer Squash Soup with Pasta and Parmesan

Parmesan Zucchini Sticks with Smoky Roasted Romesco Sauce

Spiedini of Chicken and Zucchini with Almond Salsa Verde

More

EatingWell:

Quick Packable Low-Cal Lunches
Save time, money and calories by resisting takeout and instead think grab-and-go from your kitchen.

Chunky Peach Popsicles
Make sure to reserve a portion of the peaches as you puree the mixture so the pops will be packed with icy cold, chunky bits of fruit. For a grown-up twist, try adding 1 to 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh mint, lemon verbena or basil.

Jamie Oliver:

killer mexican barbecued corn on the cob (usa imperial version)
I tried this fantastic Mexican corn at a basement Mexican restaurant in New York. We ate loads of amazing Mexican food but it was these snacky corn on the cobs which really stuck in my mind

garlic, thyme and anchovy baked potatoes (usa imperial version)
Everyone loves a baked potato and this is one of the tastiest ways to make them. Slice, fill, then fit them back together.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

2nd Egg Recall Linked to Salmonella Under Way

(HealthDay News) Another U.S. egg producer said Friday that it was recalling eggs because they could be infected with the foodborne bacteria salmonella.

Hillandale Farms of New Hampton, Iowa, said it was voluntarily recalling shell eggs sent to 14 states because there have been laboratory-confirmed cases of Salmonella enteritidis associated with the eggs…

On Wednesday, Wright County Egg, another Iowa company at the center of a massive recall of eggs linked to salmonella contamination, dramatically broadened its nationwide recall to 380 million eggs.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Stomach Bacteria Need Vitamin B6 to Establish Infection, Research Finds

(Science Daily) Scientists have determined that Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes peptic ulcers and some forms of stomach cancer, requires the vitamin B6 to establish and maintain chronic infection, according to research… This finding, along with the identification of the enzyme the microbe requires to utilize the vitamin, could lead to the development of an entirely new class of antibiotics.

"Approximately half the world's population is infected with H. pylori, yet how H. pylori bacteria establish chronic infections in human hosts remains elusive. To our knowledge, this study is the first to describe a link between this vitamin and bacterial pathogenesis," says Richard Ferrero of Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, a researcher on the study.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Virtual Colonoscopy Can Spot Cancers Outside Colon

(HealthDay News) Not only does virtual colonoscopy identify colorectal cancer, it also boosts the likelihood of detecting cancers outside of the colon, a new study shows.

Virtual colonoscopy is less invasive than regular colonoscopy. In addition to offering doctors a look at the inside of the colon, virtual colonoscopy examines the entire abdomen and pelvis.

The ability of virtual colonoscopy to identify significant lesions outside the colon at an early, treatable stage "may increase the yield" of colorectal cancer screening, thus underscoring its potential as a major screening technique, study author Dr. Ganesh R. Veerappan said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Hormone replacement may not save women's muscle

(Reuters Health) Despite some earlier evidence that hormone replacement therapy after menopause can help maintain women's muscle mass, a new study suggests that any such benefit does not last…

The findings … are in line with another recent analysis from the WHI that found no evidence HRT preserved women's muscle strength or walking speed over six years.

The new results also add to a larger picture of disappointing findings on the expected benefits of HRT -- most famously, its failure to lower women's risk of developing heart disease after menopause.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Blood Pressure Drugs Could Help Fight Frailty, Experiments Show

(Science Daily) University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston researchers believe they've found a way to use widely available blood pressure drugs to fight the muscular weakness that normally accompanies aging.

The discovery draws on research linking the loss of muscle mass with age-related changes in the behavior of the hair-thin blood vessels, or capillaries, which supply muscles with the amino acids they need for growth.

"When a young person eats food, insulin secretion causes the blood vessels in the muscle to dilate, so a lot of blood goes into the muscle and a lot of amino acids are available to build muscle proteins," said UTMB professor Elena Volpi, senior author of a paper on the work… "Older people's blood vessels have far less response to insulin, but we found that if you give them a drug that causes them to dilate, you can increase the nutritive flow to the muscles and completely restore normal growth."

Drugs that induce blood vessels to widen, called vasodilators, are commonly used to control high blood pressure and prevent angina. The UTMB study used sodium nitroprusside, a drug used in hospitals and administered intravenously.

Read more.

Community: Exercise can also bring increased blood flow to muscles, reducing the muscle loss that leads to frailty, and making sure we get enough potassium may increase the benefits exercise provides. Adults need 4,700 mg per day of potassium, according to the USDA, and it lists common food sources. Potassium is also available as a dietary supplement.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

In Seniors, 'Fear of Falling' Risky in Itself

(HealthDay News) Older people who have a fear of falling are at increased risk for future falls, regardless of their actual risk of tumbling, a new study finds…

Both actual and perceived fall risk contribute independently to a person's future risk of falling, the study authors concluded. People with a high level of anxiety about falling are most likely to suffer a fall.

Read more.

Community: By improving our sense of balance, we can reduce the risk of falling.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Nanoscale DNA Sequencing Could Spur Revolution in Personal Health Care

(Science Daily) In experiments with potentially broad health care implications, a research team led by a University of Washington physicist has devised a method that works at a very small scale to sequence DNA quickly and relatively inexpensively.

That could open the door for more effective individualized medicine, for example providing blueprints of genetic predispositions for specific conditions and diseases such as cancer, diabetes or addiction.

"The hope is that in 10 years people will have all their DNA sequenced, and this will lead to personalized, predictive medicine," said Jens Gundlach, a UW physics professor and lead author of a paper describing the new technique.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Virus May Act as 'Evolution-Proof' Biopesticide Against Malaria

(Science Daily) A naturally occurring virus in mosquitoes may serve as a "late-life-acting" insecticide by killing older adult mosquitoes that are responsible for the bulk of malaria transmission…

"Late-life-acting" insecticides (LLAIs) are now being examined as a new approach for controlling malaria as they selectively kill older mosquitoes that spread the disease, while younger mosquitoes survive just long enough to reproduce.

"Reproduction allows for relaxation of evolutionary pressures that select for resistance to the agent," say the researchers.

Read more.

Community: I really hope the mosquito killing virus doesn’t evolve into a danger to humans.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Physical Activity and Aging

(Tammy Beasley, R.D., MyRecipes.com) It's time to change your thinking that plastic surgery or expensive face creams are the only option to help you look years younger… [P]hysical activity actually changes your cells on a molecular level, making you look up to 9 years younger.

Considering that [exercise] also produces natural endorphins, those "feel good" brain chemicals that lower your blood pressure, decrease your stress and improve your mood, you have nothing to lose, except maybe a little weight and stress, right?

Read more.

Community: And FEEL at least nine years younger, as I can attest.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Link Between Walking, Cycling and Health

(Science Daily) Want a slimmer, healthier community? Try building more sidewalks, crosswalks and bike paths.

A study authored by Professor David Bassett Jr. … conclude[es] that communities with more walkers and cyclists are healthier than those where people must rely on cars to get around…

"A growing body of evidence suggests that differences in the built environment for physical activity (e.g., infrastructure for walking and cycling, availability of public transit, street connectivity, housing density and mixed land use) influence the likelihood that people will use active transport for their daily travel," the study says. "People who live in areas that are more conducive to walking and cycling are more likely to engage in these forms of active transport."

The researchers also suggest that infrastructure improvements should be combined with restrictions on car use, such as car-free zones, traffic calming in residential neighborhoods, reductions in motor vehicle speeds, and limited and more expensive car parking.

"Moreover, land-use policies should foster compact, mixed-use developments that generate shorter trip distances that are more suitable for walking and biking," they wrote.

Overall, the U.S. doesn't measure up well.

Read more.

Community: One of the many things I like about city living is that everything I need is within walking distance.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Simple Changes, Big Rewards

(Harvard Health Publications) Change your life. Three simple words, no easy task. Yet a richer, healthier life is well within your grasp. Small changes can provide surprisingly big rewards. But even making small life changes requires a thoughtful, effective plan.

Medical Editor Edward M. Phillips, M.D., Director of the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School has spearheaded our brand new Special Health Report Simple Changes, Big Rewards: A practical, easy guide for healthy, happy living.

Research has shown that the day-to-day choices you make can influence whether you maintain your good health and vitality, or develop life-shortening illnesses or disabling conditions. This Special Health Report highlights small changes in seven areas that will help enhance your health, happiness, and well-being. Guided by this report, you'll set your goals in each area. For each goal, the report provides six choices for change that will help you move toward your goal. You select the choices that appeal to you. In all, you'll find 42 different choices for change to help you exercise more, stress less, eat healthier, curb unhealthy habits, and more.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Green Leafy Vegetables Reduce Diabetes Risk, Study Finds

(Science Daily) Eating more green leafy vegetables can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, finds research published online…

Diets high in fruit and vegetables are known to help reduce both cancer and heart disease, but the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and diabetes remains unclear, say the authors…

Patrice Carter and colleagues reviewed six studies involving over 220,000 participants that focused on the links between fruit and vegetable consumption and type 2 diabetes.

The results reveal that eating one and a half extra servings of green leafy vegetables a day reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes by 14%.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Try This Tropical Treat for Healthier Lungs

(RealAge.com) Here's a swimsuit-friendly tropical treat your lungs will love: fresh papaya.

It's sweet, so your tongue will thank you. It's low-cal, so your summer clothes won't protest. And more and more research suggests your lungs may benefit from papaya as well, thanks to a key carotenoid called beta-cryptoxanthin.

In a recent large study, researchers found that people whose diets contained higher amounts of beta-cryptoxanthin were less likely to develop lung cancer -- even if they smoked… And papaya is a top source, along with oranges, tangerines, and mangoes.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Recipes

MyRecipes.com:

Quick Chicken and Dumplings
In this recipe, flour tortillas stand in for the traditional biscuit dough. To quickly thaw frozen mixed vegetables, place them in a colander and rinse with warm water for about a minute.

Healthy Cookout Menus
Summertime barbecuing is healthy as can be when you grill with lean cuts of meat, top with light and flavorful sauces, and serve with good-for-you salads and veggies.

Salmon, Meet Grill

Low-Calorie Summertime Favorites

Pasta Salads

Main-Dish Salad

7 Ways With Rotisserie Chicken

No-Cook Suppers

EatingWell

Plank-Grilled Sweet Soy Salmon
Using a plank to grill fish keeps it from sticking or falling through the grate and imparts a subtle smoky flavor to the salmon. You could also use mahi-mahi or Pacific halibut in this recipe.

12 Secrets to Spending Less at the Grocery Store
Save money with these easy strategies for shopping and cooking for less.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Take Your Vitamin D at This Time

(RealAge.com) Research suggests this nutrient will perform best if you take it during your biggest meal of the day -- be it breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

About three-quarters of us are deficient in vitamin D. Too bad, because a growing body of research links this nutrient to an amazing list of health benefits, such as lower blood pressure, stronger bones, better immunity, and possibly even a lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers. One easy way to get your D is to spend some time outside each day; just 10 to 20 minutes of sun during peak hours is all you need. But a supplement is a great backup plan. And when researchers examined D-deficient middle-aged and older adults, they found that pairing the supplement with the largest meal of their day -- rather than small meals, snacks, or an empty stomach -- doubled the participants' blood levels. (How are you doing on D? Find out whether you should have your levels tested.)

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Secrets of 'Magic' Antidepressant Revealed

(Science Daily) Yale researchers have discovered how a novel anti-depressant can take effect in hours, rather than the weeks or months usually required for most drugs currently on the market. The findings … should speed development of a safe and easy-to-administer form of the anti-depressant ketamine, which has already proven remarkably effective in treating severely depressed patients.

The Yale scientists found that, in rats, ketamine not only quickly improves depression-like behaviors but actually restores connections between brain cells damaged by chronic stress.

"It's like a magic drug -- one dose can work rapidly and last for seven to 10 days," said Ronald Duman, professor of psychiatry and pharmacology at Yale and senior author of the study.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Painkiller use linked to stroke risk

(Reuters Health) Common painkillers that have been linked to an increased risk of heart attack may also elevate risk of stroke, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that among nearly 38,000 Taiwanese adults who suffered a stroke over one year, the use of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in the prior month may have elevated their stroke risk.

The increases linked to individual NSAIDs were generally modest, the investigators report in the medical journal Stroke. And the findings do not prove that the medications themselves led to some people's strokes.

NSAIDs are a group of painkillers that include over-the-counter medications like aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin and other brands) and naproxen (Aleve), as well as prescription arthritis drugs known as COX-2 inhibitors.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Testing of Brothers May Boost Family's Prostate Cancer Rates

(HealthDay News) Men who have a brother with prostate cancer are more likely than other men to be diagnosed with the disease, but the reason may have more to do with greater surveillance than genetics, a new study suggests…

The study results could offer guidance to doctors, the authors suggested.

"When counseling men about their risk of hereditary predisposition to prostate cancer, one should consider the possibility that a familial aggregation of prostate cancer may be at least partially caused by increased diagnostic activity."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Breast cancer yoga improves recovery

(UPI) A specialized Iyengar yoga program for women receiving breast cancer treatment makes a positive difference in their recovery, Canadian researchers say…

The study, published in the journal Cancer Nursing, finds that after the yoga 94 percent said they had improvements in their quality of life; 88 percent say they felt better physically; 87 percent reported being happier and 80 percent said they were less tired.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Breast Cancer Survivors Don't Need to Be Afraid of Air Travel, Study Suggests

(Science Daily) University of Alberta researcher Margie McNeely says results from an international study she was part of indicates certain precautions about the risk of lymphedema for breast cancer survivors are outdated.

McNeely, from the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, says women who've had breast cancer surgery are often warned that pressure changes in an airplane cabin could trigger lymphedema, chronic swelling in the arm. But the study she did with an Australian research team showed that only five per cent of these women are likely at risk of developing any arm swelling when flying…

McNeely says that, until now, information about air travel and lymphedema risk has not been based on solid evidence, but says this research shows that while there is a risk of developing lymphedema during flight, that risk is very low.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Trauma care effective, and cost effective

(UPI) Trauma center treatment is expensive but the benefits, in terms of lives saved and quality of life-years gained, outweigh the costs, U.S. researchers say…

The report found trauma center care is cost-effective for all patients taken together, and is of particular value for people with very severe injuries and those younger than age 55…

"Taken together with our previous work demonstrating the effectiveness of trauma centers in saving lives, the results unequivocally support the need for continued efforts and funding for regionalized systems of trauma care in the United States," [Ellen MacKenzie of The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Injury Research and Policy] says.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Workplace Wellness Plan Saves Money Over the Long-Term, New Study Shows

(Science Daily) A Midwest utility company learned firsthand that it pays to keep healthy employees fit, reaping a net savings of $4.8 million in employee health and lost work time costs over nine years…

[T]he utility company spent $7.3 million for the program and showed $12.1 million in savings associated with participation. Medical and pharmacy costs, time off and worker's compensation factored into the savings…

Slowly, companies are realizing that while insurance plans must care for sick employees, those plans must also include wellness plans to keep healthy workers healthy, [Dee Edington, director of the U-M Health Management Research Center and principal investigator,] said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Workplace is the 'new neighborhood'

(UPI) The workplace has become increasingly important for maintaining social interaction and forming relationships, especially in retirement, Dutch researchers say…

Lead author Rabina Cozijnsen of the VU University Amsterdam says those who retired just 10 years ago are more likely than those who retired in the 1990s to maintain, or even gain, work-related personal ties after retirement…

"The notion that people lose their work-related ties after retirement, because they no longer see one another at work, needs to be reconsidered, in terms of well-being and the aging process."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Discovery May Aid Search for Anti-Aging Drugs

(Science Daily) A team of University of Michigan scientists has found that suppressing a newly discovered gene lengthens the lifespan of roundworms. Scientists who study aging have long known that significantly restricting food intake makes animals live longer. But the goal is to find less drastic ways to achieve the same effect in humans someday.

The U-M results offer promising early evidence that scientists may succeed at finding targets for drugs that someday could allow people to live longer, healthier lives.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Stressful Social Situations May Be Physically Harmful in Some

(HealthDay News) Stress caused by social situations, such as giving a speech or going to a job interview, can affect some people's immune system in ways that harm their health, researchers have found.

The study included 124 volunteers who were purposely put into awkward social situations. Those who exhibited greater neural sensitivity to social rejection also had greater increases in inflammatory activity when exposed to social stress…

The findings provide "further evidence of how closely our mind and body are connected…," [lead author George] Slavich said.

Increases in inflammatory activity are part of the immune system's natural response to potentially harmful situations, but "frequent or chronic activation of the system may increase the risk for a variety of disorders, including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease and even depression," Slavich added.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Stress in Middle Age Could Contribute to Late-Life Dementia

(Science Daily) Psychological stress in middle age could lead to the development of dementia later in life, especially Alzheimer's disease, reveals research from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Based on data from a study which followed women for 35 years, this is the first research in Sweden to indicate a link between stress and dementia…

[Says researcher Lena Johansson:] "This study could result in a better understanding of the risk factors for dementia, but our results need to be confirmed by other studies, and further research is needed in the area. Most of those who said that they were stressed did not develop dementia, so it's not currently possible to advise people to be less stressed or warn about the dangers of high stress levels due to an increased risk of developing dementia."

Read more.

Community: Many of the ways to ease stress are the same as the ways to relieve anxiety.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Moderate Wine Drinking Associated With Better Cognitive Function

(Science Daily) A large prospective study of 5033 men and women … in northern Norway has reported that moderate wine consumption is independently associated with better performance on cognitive tests. The subjects (average age 58 and free of stroke) were followed over 7 years during which they were tested with a range of cognitive function tests.

Among women, there was a lower risk of a poor testing score for those who consumed wine at least 4 or more times over two weeks in comparison with those who drink <>

The authors state…: "A positive effect of wine . . . could also be due to confounders such as socio-economic status and more favourable dietary and other lifestyle habits."

Read more.

Community: If you don’t drink, you can get resveratrol, the ingredient in red wine that’s believed to be the beneficial factor, in a food supplement.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Recipes

MyRecipes.com:

Feta Chicken and Vegetables
Crumbled feta cheese and fresh vegetable strips bring the flavor of the Mediterranean to the table in no time with this quick all-in-one dish.

Ancho Pork Medallions
Pepper jelly and aromatic spices give your average pork tenderloin a bold new flavor. Serve with a spinach salad for a complete meal.

5 to Try: Pork Chops

EatingWell:

Spaghetti Frittata
Leftover spaghetti? Try mixing it with eggs for an Italian omelet.

Skillet Gnocchi with Chard & White Beans

Chilaquiles Casserole

Cooking Light:

Our Best Healthy Lunch Ideas
Our definitive guide to a healthy lunch on the go—complete with nutrition-boosting tips, make-ahead strategies, and tasty pack-and-go recipes

Chicken Pitas

Fresh Tomato Soup

Curried Chicken Salad

Blueberry-Orange Parfaits

Superfast Italian
Pasta, pizza, and everything in between can be ready in 20 minutes or less with these quick and easy dishes.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Vitamin D May Treat or Prevent Allergy to Common Mold

(Science Daily) Research … has found that vitamin D may be an effective therapeutic agent to treat or prevent allergy to a common mold that can complicate asthma and frequently affects patients with Cystic Fibrosis…

The environmental mold, Aspergillus fumigatus, is one of the most prevalent fungal organisms inhaled by people. In the vast majority, it is not associated with disease. However, in asthmatics and in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), it can cause significant allergic symptoms.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Even Modest Weight Gain Can Harm Blood Vessels, Researchers Find

(Science Daily) Mayo Clinic researchers found that healthy young people who put on as little as 9 pounds of fat, specifically in the abdomen, are at risk for developing endothelial cell dysfunction. Endothelial cells line the blood vessels and control the ability of the vessels to expand and contract.

"Endothelial dysfunction has long been associated with an increased risk for coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events," says Virend Somers, M.D., Ph.D., a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic. "Gaining a few pounds in college, on a cruise, or over the holidays is considered harmless, but it can have cardiovascular implications, especially if the weight is gained in the abdomen."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Online tool helps identify diabetes risk

(UPI) British researchers say they have come up with an easy way for people to learn their risk of diabetes online…

"The Diabetes Risk Score is already being used in a number of other studies to identify people at high risk of diabetes and encourage them to see their doctor," [study leader Melanie] Davies says in a statement.

The Diabetes Risk Score is online at www.diabetes.org.uk/riskscore -- the Diabetes UK web site -- and has already been taken by more than 21,000 people, Davies said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Tai Chi May Help Ease Fibromyalgia

(HealthDay News) Fibromyalgia sufferers may find relief from the chronic pain condition by doing tai chi, new research finds…

At the end of 12 weeks, the tai chi group reported improvements in their scores on questionnaires regarding both physical and mental fibromyalgia symptoms. That included decreased pain and increased ability to do daily tasks without pain; less fatigue, depression and anxiety; and an overall better quality of life. Patients also reported better sleep quality and improved physical conditioning.

The improvements were still evident at 24 weeks, according to the research.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Antidepressant treats menopause depression

(UPI) An antidepressant can alleviate symptoms of major depression in women in menopause or perimenopause, the years before menopause, U.S. researchers found…

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, found women who took Pristiq showed significant improvement -- 58.6 percent for those taking Pristiq, compared to 38.2 percent for those on placebo -- using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and other psychological tests.

The medication was effective among the subgroups of perimenopausal women as well as those who were post-menopausal, [Dr. Susan G. ] Kornstein said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Heart Failure Hospitalizations Lowest in Mountain States

(HealthDay News) The Mountain states region of the United States had the lowest average rate of potentially avoidable hospitalization for heart failure in 2006, according to a U.S. government report released Wednesday…

Potentially avoidable hospitalizations are admissions for care of chronic illnesses that could be prevented if patients had good quality outpatient care. Patients who receive poor quality outpatient care are at increased risk for complications that require hospitalization, explained the authors.

Read more.

Community: This finding could be related to the facts that there’s less obesity and more physical activity in Western states.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Palliative Care May Boost Mood, Survival

(HealthDay News) Palliative care is often thought of as a medical measure of "last resort."

But a new study suggests that starting palliative care early in the treatment of patients with advanced lung cancer can boost their quality of life, lift their mood and lengthen their lives…

Patients and their families have misconceptions about palliative care, said study co-author Dr. Vicki Jackson… "I think one common misconception is that palliative care is a treatment only for patients in the final days and weeks of their lives," she noted.

Not so, she said. "Palliative care is a service -- a group of clinicians who help patients with serious illness focus on quality of life and help them live as well as they can, as long as they can," she explained…

A typical palliative care team, Jackson said, includes doctors, social workers, nurse-practitioners and chaplains.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]