A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

Anxiety may worsen prognosis for heart patients

(Reuters Health) Anxiety increases heart patients' likelihood of suffering a heart attack, stroke, or heart failure, new research shows.

And the link between anxiety and such events can't be explained by health behaviors like smoking, severity of disease, or biological factors such as hormone levels or heart rate, Dr. Elisabeth J. Martens … and colleagues found.

"This was quite surprising," Martens told Reuters Health by email. "The next step will be to find out how anxiety disorder leads to poor cardiovascular outcomes."

Read more.

Community: Treatments for anxiety, as we’ve seen, include jasmine scent, cognitive therapy with a competent therapist, “relaxation drinks”, exercise, yoga, tai chi, massage, relaxation/meditation, apple juice, chamomile tea, breathing in the soil bacterium M. vaccae, getting old, and helping others. And that’s only from scanning Many Years Young back through March of this year.

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Severe Angina Poses Three Times the Coronary Artery Disease Risk for Women Than Men

(Science Daily) Women who have the most serious form of angina are three times as likely to develop severe coronary artery disease (CAD) as men with the same condition, according to [new research].

"[O]ur research found that women with CCS Class IV angina, which means they are unable to perform any activity without symptoms and even suffer angina at rest, are significantly more likely to develop severe CAD than men with the same condition," [the scientists said].

The authors believe that this information is vital for clinicians deciding which patients to refer for coronary angiography.

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Device could warn driver: Curve ahead

(UPI) A device monitoring eye movements could warn that a winding road needs driver attention, German researchers say.

"If the driver does not show his typical pattern of eye movements upon approaching a bend, then the system will assume that he has not seen it and will warn him in time," study author Farid Kandil … says in a statement.

Kandil's goal is to build an in-car device that warns the driver in danger of unintentionally departing from the lane.

Read more.

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Marijuana Derivative Could Be Useful for Pain Treatment

(Science Daily) A new compound similar to the active component of marijuana (cannabis) might provide effective pain relief without the mental and physical side effects of cannabis, according to a study…

Dr. Steven L. Shafer [said,] "Although preliminary, these studies suggest that synthetic cannabinoids may be significant step forward for patients suffering from neuropathic pain."

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Therapy may help some with deadly peanut allergy

(Reuters Health) Peanut allergy has proven to be a tough nut to crack. While there's still no way to make peanuts completely safe for people who are allergic to them, an experimental therapy may make them less deadly, report researchers from Germany and the US…

According to U.S. government figures, peanuts and tree nut allergies are the leading causes of fatal and near fatal food-allergic reactions.

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When dieting, watch your vitamins: study

(Reuters Health) When weighing the benefits of one weight-loss plan over another, dieters may want to consider what else might be cut with the calories and carbs, suggests a new study…

The focus of [the most] popular diets typically rests on both the overall amount of food consumed and the relative quantities of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Vitamins and minerals tend to be overlooked.

In a comparison of four weight-loss plans, researchers from Stanford University in California found significant differences in the consumption of these nutrients…

One potential way to fill in the holes of any diet is through vitamin and mineral supplements.

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MyRecipes.com

Roast Chicken Salad with Peaches, Goat Cheese, and Pecans
Fresh peaches and goat cheese headline this simple no-cook salad recipe. The 8-ingredient vinaigrette, made with pantry staples, takes minutes to make and is a delicious compliment to the other ingredients in the salad. Use a store-bought rotisserie chicken to save time in the kitchen. Serve with herbed bread.

5 to Try: Easy Quiches

Simple Lamb Dinners

5-Ingredient Chicken Recipes

Dinner Tonight Made Easy
Editor Holley Grainger shares recipe ideas for healthy family dinners, ready in 45 minutes or less.

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Cumulative Radiation Doses Seen in Cardiac Imaging

(HealthDay News) Cardiac imaging procedures, the use of which has exploded in the United States in recent years, are exposing patients to potentially cumulative doses of radiation, according to the largest analysis of its kind.

But experts really don't know whether the amounts of radiation are harmful or what the long-term effects will be, according to new research…

Heart experts were quick to point out that cardiac imaging, particularly myocardial perfusion imaging and cardiac computed tomography, may be necessary in many cases to save lives…

Cardiovascular disease … is the leading killer of both men and women in the world.

Read more.

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Neural Stem Cells Attack Glioblastoma Cells

(Science Daily) [German scientists] have demonstrated how the brain's own stem cells and precursor cells control the growth of glioblastomas. Of all brain tumors, glioblastomas are among the most common and most aggressive…

Glioblastomas are brain tumors that are most common in adults in their mid-fifties or early sixties. The causes for developing the disease are not yet known. Researchers assume that misdirected neural stem cells / precursor cells mutate into cancer cells and can form glioblastomas…

[T]he activity of stem cells in the brain and thus of the body's own protective mechanism against glioblastomas diminishes with increasing age. This could explain why the tumors usually develop in older adults and not in children and young people.

The discovery of the[se] tumor stem cells has led to new concepts in the therapy of glioblastomas. "Normal cancer cells" can be destroyed using conventional therapies (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy), which are seldom successful in tumor stem cells. The aim is therefore to develop therapy concepts to destroy these tumor stem cells. The findings from the mouse experiments of the researchers in Berlin could point to a new approach: reprogramming tumor stem cells into less harmful cells, which could then be destroyed with a therapy.

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Stemming advanced prostate cancer growth

(UPI) U.S. researchers say their findings may open the door for new treatments for advanced prostate cancer…

"This is exciting because it shows how the cancer cells have developed a way to boost androgen receptor activity, even in the absence or at low levels of the hormone that binds the androgen receptor," study leader Elizabeth Wilson said in a statement. "The MAGE-11 molecule is a promising target for shutting down androgen receptor activity that promotes the growth of cancer cells."

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Honey Bee Venom May Help Design New Treatments

(Science Daily) Scientists researching a toxin extracted from the venom of the honey bee have used this to inform the design of new treatments to alleviate the symptoms of conditions such as muscular dystrophy, depression and dementia.

Apamin, a natural peptide toxin found in bee venom, is known for its ability to block a type of ion channel that enables a high-speed and selective flow of potassium ions out of nerves. The blocking of these channels in brain causes nerves to become hyperexcitable, producing improved learning that has implications for the treatment of dementia and depression. In addition, injection of apamin improves the symptoms experienced by sufferers of myotonic muscular dystrophy (MD).

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Antibody May Help Treat and Prevent Influenza Outbreaks

(Science Daily) Researchers have discovered a monoclonal antibody that is effective against "Avian" H5N1, seasonal H1N1 and the 2009 "Swine" H1N1 influenza…

This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies to protect and treat influenza. While the study was limited to mice, the activity is reflective of the potential benefit to humans. Anti-influenza antibody therapeutics could help to fill the current gap in the existing arsenal of treatments against influenza and could, one day, help to contain a deadly pandemic, according to the authors.

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Wrist Fractures May Open Door to Disability in Older Women

(HealthDay News) A fractured wrist can lead to the development of disability in older people and harm their quality of life, new research has found…

According to study author Dr. Beatrice Edwards … and colleagues, wrist fracture-related functional decline was clinically as significant as other known risk factors such as falls, arthritis and diabetes.

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FDA Reviewer Questions Results of Key Avandia Trial

(HealthDay News) One step ahead of a planned government review of the safety of Avandia, new doubts surfaced Friday on a key trial that helped keep the blockbuster diabetes drug on the market.

A medical reviewer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration posted remarks on the agency's Web site Friday suggesting that drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline's "mishandling" of trial results may have masked some cardiovascular effects of Avandia (rosiglitazone).

The official's posting was part of a safety reassessment package prepared for next week's advisory panel meeting that could determine the future of the controversial drug.

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Intoxicating Fragrance: Jasmine as Valium Substitute

(Science Daily) Instead of a sleeping pill or a mood enhancer, a nose full of jasmine from Gardenia jasminoides could also help…

[Researchers] have discovered that the two fragrances Vertacetal-coeur (VC) and the chemical variation (PI24513) have the same molecular mechanism of action and are as strong as the commonly prescribed barbiturates or propofol. They soothe, relieve anxiety and promote sleep.

Injected or inhaled, the fragrances generated a calming effect: in a Plexiglas cage whose air contained a high concentration of the fragrance, the mice ceased all activity and sat quietly in the corner. Via the air breathed in, the scent molecules go from the lungs into the blood and then transmitted from there to the brain.

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Community: Coming soon to a crowd control squad near you?

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Phys Ed: Your Brain on Exercise

(Well, New York Times) What goes on inside your brain when you exercise?...

[S]cientists have been manipulating the levels of bone-morphogenetic protein or BMP in the brains of laboratory mice. BMP, which is found in tissues throughout the body, affects cellular development in various ways, some of them deleterious. In the brain, BMP has been found to contribute to the control of stem cell divisions. Your brain, you will be pleased to learn, is packed with adult stem cells, which, given the right impetus, divide and differentiate into either additional stem cells or baby neurons. As we age, these stem cells tend to become less responsive. They don’t divide as readily and can slump into a kind of cellular sleep. It’s BMP that acts as the soporific, says Dr. Jack Kessler, the chairman of neurology at Northwestern and senior author of many of the recent studies. The more active BMP and its various signals are in your brain, the more inactive your stem cells become and the less neurogenesis you undergo. Your brain grows slower, less nimble, older.

But exercise countermands some of the numbing effects of BMP, Dr. Kessler says. In work at his lab, mice given access to running wheels had about 50 percent less BMP-related brain activity within a week. They also showed a notable increase in Noggin, a beautifully named brain protein that acts as a BMP antagonist…

Walk, jog, swim, pedal — the exact amount or intensity of the exercise required has not been determined, although it appears that the minimum is blessedly low. In mice, [Fred] Gage says, “even a fairly short period” of exercise “and a short distance seems to produce results.”

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The Most Common Fitness Mistake People Make

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Think fast: What’s your favorite type of exercise? If you’re like most people, cardio is at the top of your list. But focusing too much on cardio while neglecting core-strengthening exercises can result in weak core muscles and poor flexibility — and that can increase your chances of getting hurt. Even those who do conventional weight lifting may be vulnerable to injury, since this type of exercise tends to isolate muscle groups and neglect those all-important core muscles…

Dr. Arthur Agatston, leading preventive cardiologist and author of The South Beach Diet Supercharged, emphasizes the importance of functional fitness — core-strengthening exercises that mimic everyday activities, such as bending, lifting, and pressing — in addition to cardio conditioning. Here’s more on the benefits of functional fitness:

• You’ll strengthen your core muscles…

• You’ll tone your muscles and improve bone density…

• No expensive equipment needed!

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Gameworld: Motion games broaden uses beyond exercise

(Reuters Life!) Ever since Nintendo launched the Wii, gamers have been interacting with characters and working out with virtual trainers in titles like Electronic Arts' "EA Sports Active" or Ubisoft's "Your Shape."…

Now researchers, scientists and game developers are using Nintendo's console for many other health-oriented applications, and in some cases are getting millions of dollars in grants to dream up new technologies…

John Lumpkin, MD, senior vice president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, has seen first-hand the advances that motion-sensor controllers and physical games have had on both his patients and his own children.

"These games promote motion, which increases the heart rate and burns more calories," said Lumpkin. "Even a game with the simplest motion like playing drums on 'Rock Band' can have a gamer burning twice as many calories per hour as he or she would just sitting around, while a more vigorous game like 'Dance Dance Revolution' can burn as many as six times the amount of calories," said Lumpkin.

Lumpkin said what really excites him, and many in his field, is that fact that today researchers are using a Wii balance board game to help stroke victims regain their balance just as effectively as an $18,000 piece of equipment.

That's one reason why the Games for Health sector has been growing exponentially over the past six years with no slowdown in sight.

Read more.

Community: How long do you think it will be before there are national and international competitions using these games, where people don’t even have to leave their homes to compete?

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Enriched Environment Might Curb Cancer Growth

(Science Daily) Living in an environment rich with physical, mental and social stimulation -- a setting that causes mild stress -- might by itself curb cancer growth, according to a new study…

The researchers discovered that an enriched environment activates a nervous-system pathway by which the brain talks to fat tissue. That pathway … tells fat cells to stop releasing a hormone called leptin into the bloodstream. Leptin normally helps restrain appetite, but this study discovered that it also accelerates cancer growth…

The enriched environment created for this study housed 20 mice in large containers equipped with toys, hiding places and running wheels, along with unlimited food and water. Control mice were housed in groups of five in smaller, standard laboratory containers with no toys but with unlimited food and water.

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Cancer-Fighting Roles of Intriguing Plant Compounds

(Agricultural Research Magazine) An array of studies from scientists at the Agricultural Research Service’s Western Human Nutrition Research Center in Davis, California, is yielding new clues about the roles that compounds from plants may play in preventing cancer and other diseases.

For example, molecular biologist Susan J. Zunino has investigated the role that certain compounds in strawberries may have in combating cancer. Her tests with lab-cultured cells of a cancer known as “acute lymphoblastic leukemia” have provided additional evidence that three compounds occurring naturally in strawberries—ellagic acid, kaempferol, and quercetin—can cause death, or significant damage, to certain lines of these leukemia cells…

ARS colleague Daniel H. Hwang, also a molecular biologist at Davis, investigates the ability of plant chemicals to protect us from harmful inflammation. Unwanted inflammation can increase risk not only of cancer, but also of certain other disorders, including heart disease and insulin resistance.

Hwang and a team of coinvestigators have teased out precise details of how six natural compounds in plants—luteolin, quercetin, chrysin, eriodicytol, hesperetin, and naringenin—apparently act as anti-inflammatory agents.

Luteolin is found in celery, thyme, green peppers, and chamomile tea. Foods rich in quercetin include capers, apples, and onions. Oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and other citrus fruits are good sources of hesperetin, eriodicytol, and naringenin. Chrysin is from the fruit of blue passionflower, a tropical vine.

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Fish Oil Supplements Linked to Lower Risk of Breast Cancer: Study

(HealthDay News) Postmenopausal women who take fish oil supplements may reduce their breast cancer risk, a new study suggests.

The study focused on the potential health benefits of 15 different so-called "specialty" supplements to see if they affect breast cancer risk, said study senior author Emily White, an epidemiologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

"The only one that had an effect was fish oil," she said.

Fish oil supplements, made from fatty fish such as salmon, contain high levels of omega-3 fatty acids.

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5 Smart Ways to Beat Cheating

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Let’s face it: We all sometimes give in to temptations, especially when it comes to food. So if you cheat a little while following the South Beach Diet, does it mean you've failed? Not even close! Everyone is bound to have moments of weakness, and the good news is that you can get back on track easily…

If you find yourself cheating on a regular basis, try these tips to avoid temptation:

  1. Skip the chip and cookie aisles at the grocery store and focus on the fresh foods around the perimeter.
  2. Empty your cupboards and refrigerator of all the unhealthy foods that trigger your cravings.
  3. When going out to eat, don't tease yourself by looking at the dessert menu. Instead, plan on eating a serving of sugar-free gelatin or a sugar-free Popsicle when you get home.
  4. Always carry a healthy snack with you, like a reduced-fat cheese stick or a handful of nuts.
  5. If someone gives you an indulgent present, like a box of chocolates or your favorite cookies, bring it into work, or give it to a neighbor or friend.

Source

Community: The most important thing is not to give up altogether after giving in to a craving. I used to think that if I failed once, it was all over. I couldn’t do it. I should just give up. Then I realized that was a lie my brain was telling me. I DON’T have to give up. But I might want to reassess what I’m doing. Maybe I’m trying to do too much too soon, and need to slow down a bit.

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MyRecipes.com

Farfalle with Tomatoes, Onions, and Spinach
Give your family a taste of the Mediterranean with this simple pasta recipe. Add grilled chicken for an even heartier meal.

Sizzling Grilled Steaks

Using a Food Grinder Attachment

Dinner Tonight Made Easy
Editor Holley Grainger shares recipe ideas for healthy family dinners, ready in 45 minutes or less.

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Popular food additive can cause stomach ache

(Reuters Health) "Stealth fiber" increasingly added to processed foods, while not a problem for most, can cause gastrointestinal discomfort for some who may not know they're consuming too much of it, Minnesota researchers warn. The fiber is called "inulin."…

Inulin is a carbohydrate fiber that occurs naturally in many foods like bananas, wheat, onions and garlic. Found in high concentrations in chicory root, is can be extracted for industrial use. Unlike more familiar carbohydrates, which are broken down in the small intestines and turned into fuel for the body, inulin passes through the small intestines to the colon where it stimulates the growth of "good bacteria" and is fermented by bacteria. In some people it can cause gas, bloating, flatulence, and diarrhea.

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Way to Detect Prediabetes

(Science Daily) Having discovered a dramatic increase of an easy-to-detect enzyme in the red blood cells of people with diabetes and prediabetes, Johns Hopkins scientists say the discovery could lead to a simple, routine test for detecting the subtle onset of the disease, before symptoms or complications occur and in time to reverse its course.

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Combining Sex and Drugs Reduces Rock and Roll

(Science Daily) Sharing a bottle of red wine may seem like the best recipe for a romantic interlude. However, the evening may not turn out as planned according to a Concordia University study, which evaluated the effect of a wide range of drugs, including alcohol, on sexual behaviour. The findings … definitively show that despite our preconceived notions, use of many recreational drugs can cause a loss in that lovin' feeling.

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People can indeed be addicted to love

(UPI) New York researchers found people can be addicted to love the same as they can become addicted to drugs because the same parts of the brain are involved…

The researchers had the study subjects view photos of their former partners and the researchers saw several key areas of participants' brains were activated, including the parts involved in motivation and reward and involved in romantic love; craving and addiction -- specifically the dopaminergic reward system evident in cocaine addiction; and physical pain and distress.

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Chemical Makes Brain Cells Grow, Thwarts Mental Decline in Aging Rats

(Science Daily) Scientists have discovered a compound that restores the capacity to form new memories in aging rats, likely by improving the survival of newborn neurons in the brain's memory hub. The research has turned up clues to a neuroprotective mechanism that could lead to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease…

"This striking demonstration of a treatment that stems age-related cognitive decline in living animals points the way to potential development of the first cures that will address the core illness process in Alzheimer's disease," said NIMH Director Thomas Insel, M.D.

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Heart Beat May Provide Clues to Kidney Health

(Science Daily) Individuals with a high resting heart rate and a low beat-to-beat heart rate variability have an increased risk of developing kidney disease, according to a study… The findings suggest that the behavior of the autonomic nervous system may be a sentinel marker for late development of certain cases of kidney disease.

The autonomic nervous system regulates unconscious body functions, including heart rate, blood pressure, temperature regulation, and responses to stress. Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (dysautonomia) has been linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its progression.

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Scientists Reprogram Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells to Respond to Tamoxifen

(Science Daily) Using a small molecule decoy, investigators … have managed to block protein interactions and induce epigenetic reprogramming in human and mouse breast cancer cells, essentially changing the gene expression of breast cancer cells to behave in a more normal manner.

The research illustrates what may perhaps become an effective targeted epigenetic therapy in breast cancer. Interestingly, the targeted treatment showed exciting results in triple-negative breast cancer cells, reverting their function and appearance, and sensitizing them to tamoxifen and retinoids.

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High Blood Levels of Vitamin E Reduces Risk of Alzheimer's

(Science Daily) High levels of several vitamin E components in the blood are associated with a decreased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in advanced age, suggesting that vitamin E may help prevent cognitive deterioration in elderly people. This is the conclusion reached in a Swedish study…

The study found that subjects with higher blood levels of all the vitamin E family forms had a reduced risk of developing AD, compared to subjects with lower levels. After adjusting for various confounders, the risk was reduced by 45-54%, depending on the vitamin E component…

Another recent study indicated that supplements containing high doses of the E vitamin form ±-tocopherol may increase mortality, emphasizing that … dietary supplements, if not used in a balanced way, may be more harmful than previously thought.

Read more.

Community: So maybe it might be better to get our vitamin E from foods, rather than supplements. According to the NIH, vitamin E is available from Wheat germ, corn, nuts, seeds, olives, spinach and other green leafy vegetables, asparagus, vegetable oils -- corn, sunflower, soybean, cottonseed -- and products made from these foods.

I put wheat germ on my morning oatmeal, I have a salad every day with spinach as the basic ingredient, we use only vegetable oils for cooking and to make our salad dressings, and I eat some nuts every evening. Maybe I won’t get Alzheimer’s!

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U.S. Cancer Death Rate Keeps Falling: Report

(HealthDay News) The number of deaths due to cancer continues to decline in the United States, according to new statistics from the American Cancer Society…

"The decline in cancer incidence and mortality among the U.S. population is a positive sign that public health campaigns and public policy regarding smoking, and greater utilization of and stricter guidelines for cancer screenings are working," agreed Monique N. Hernandez, a senior research analyst…

[T]he good news hasn't affected all Americans equally. Indeed, the report found that black men are 14 percent more likely to get cancer and 34 percent more likely to die than white men, while black women have a 7 percent lower cancer rate overall but are 17 percent more likely to die than white women.

To help eliminate those disparities, Hernandez believes that experts and policymakers "must move beyond traditional behavioral explanations, such as individual smoking habits and screening utilization, and encompass aspects of the social, political, and economic contexts of health, which are also heavily variable by geography."

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Monitoring Blood Pressure at Home May Help Keep It Low

(HealthDay News) With proper training, people with high blood pressure may be able to control it more effectively on their own at home than through conventional methods, British researchers contend.

Through telemonitoring of their blood pressure and adjusting their medications according to guidelines agreed upon in advance, patients assigned to self-managed care saw greater reductions in blood pressure after six and 12 months than patients receiving standard care through health professionals, the study found.

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Doctor-Patient E-Mails Are a Healthy Addition, Research Shows

(HealthDay News) Patients with diabetes or hypertension or both who communicated with their doctors via e-mail got better care and better health outcomes, new California research contends.

The improvements as a result of the e-mail exchanges included such measures as blood sugar and blood pressure control, according to a report…

Patients also tended to respect the doctor's time, with three-quarters sending messages on actual medical issues as opposed to "their mother's favorite meatloaf recipe," said Terhilda Garrido, … senior author of the study.

"It sounds a little cliche . . . but the hypothesis [about why this works] is that putting the information in the patient's hands makes them feel empowered and, therefore, in control of their condition," Garrido added.

"A lot of our patients say this actually makes them closer or more connected to their physician, and there's information in the health literature that that kind of bonding and improved relationship is very supportive of improved health outcomes," she said.

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Therapist Competence Matters -- And More for Some Patients Than Others

(Science Daily) While studies have shown that cognitive therapy is an effective treatment for depression, it has still not been clear the role therapists' training and expertise plays in making treatment successful.

A new study finds that depressed patients show more symptom improvement when their therapists more competently follow the guidelines for delivering cognitive therapy.

The study also suggests therapist competence may be a particularly important determinant of outcome for some patients. Researchers found that therapist competence was more strongly related to symptom improvement in patients who suffered from anxiety as well as depression, and for those who first experienced depression at an early age.

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Knee Arthritis? Flexible Options Can Help Keep You Active

(Science Daily) Middle-aged men and women with osteoarthritis of the knee now have more options than ever before for treatments that may allow them to remain active in the sports they love, according to a review…

While some patients may eventually require surgery, [lead author Dr. Brian] Feeley said in most cases, non-operative management such as bracing, viscosupplementation (injection of hyaluronic acid), activity modification or anti-inflammatory medication might be used initially, to see if the symptoms resolve or if there is enough improvement to make surgery unnecessary…

Although alternative treatments like acupuncture, glucosamine and chondroitin may be incorporated into an overall treatment plan, Dr. Feeley noted that currently there is no strong clinical evidence supporting the efficacy of these alternative-types of treatment.

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Protein Must Exist in Specific Brain Cells to Prevent Diet-Induced Obesity

(Science Daily) A protein found in cells throughout the body must be present in a specific set of neurons in the brain to prevent weight gain after chronic feeding on high-calorie meals, new findings from UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers suggest.

Nicknamed the "longevity" protein because of its apparent role in mediating the effects of dietary restriction on life span, SIRT1 has been studied as a potential target for anti-aging drugs. Prior research also has shown that this metabolic sensor protein in peripheral tissues plays an important role in regulating metabolism, but its physiological relevance in brain neurons remained unclear.

"This is the first study to show that SIRT1 … is required for preventing diet-induced obesity and maintaining normal body weight," said Dr. Roberto Coppari…

Dr. Coppari said the idea of a drug that selectively could target neurons controlling specific fat depots -- and that could trigger the remodeling of white fat into brown fat -- has high potential…

"We could control the remodeling of a particular fat depot into brown, which would then be more likely to cause weight loss without increasing the risk of cardiovascular problems," he said.

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MyRecipes.com

Pan-Roasted Chicken Cutlets with Maple-Mustard Dill Sauce
Pounding chicken breast halves ensures they'll cook quickly and evenly. Serve with side of orange-scented couscous to bring out the orange flavors in the sauce.

Sizzling Grilled Steaks

Using a Food Grinder Attachment

Are You Getting Enough Water?

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Amid the Murk of 'Gut Flora,' Vitamin D Receptor Emerges as a Key Player

(Science Daily) Within the human digestive tract is a teeming mass of hundreds of types of bacteria, a potpourri of microbes numbering in the trillions that help us digest food and keep bad bacteria in check.

Now scientists have found that the vitamin D receptor is a key player amid the gut bacteria…

The scientists found that Salmonella was much more virulent and aggressive in mice in which the vitamin D receptor had been turned off. These mice showed higher levels of activity of inflammatory molecules, and they lost weight more quickly and were much more likely to die in response to infection.

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Biologists Identify a New Clue Into Cellular Aging

(Science Daily) The ability to combat some age-related diseases, such as cancer and diabetes, may rest with scientists unlocking clues about the molecular and cellular processes governing aging. The underlying theory is that if the healthy portion of an individual's life span can be extended, it may delay the onset of certain age-related diseases. In the search to understand these molecular processes, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have uncovered an important new DAF-16 isoform -- DAF-16d/f -- that collaborates with other DAF-16 protein isoforms to regulate longevity…

Because the DAF-16 gene in [the worm] C. elegans is homologous to the FOXO gene in mammals, it may provide clues to longevity in humans…

The next line of inquiry will explore whether an increase in life span correlates to the health of the worm.

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Pinpoint Precision: Delivering a Biochemical Payload to One Cell

(Science Daily) Imagine being able to drop a toothpick on the head of one particular person standing among 100,000 people in a stadium. It sounds impossible, yet this degree of precision at the cellular level has been demonstrated by researchers…

The team used precise electrical fields as "tweezers" to guide and place gold nanowires, each about one-two hundredth the size of a cell, on predetermined spots, each on a single cell. Molecules coating the surfaces of the nanowires then triggered a biochemical cascade of actions only in the cell where the wire touched, without affecting other cells nearby. The researchers say this technique could lead to better ways of studying individual cells or even cell parts, and eventually could produce novel methods of delivering medication.

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Robots Preclude Neck Incision for Thyroid Surgery

(Science Daily) Robots that revolutionized gynecologic and urologic surgery in the past decade now offer the option of removing at least a portion of their diseased thyroid gland without the hallmark neck incision, researchers said…

The daVinci Surgical System, in which surgeons sitting at a console maneuver through tight spaces and around corners, enables access to the thyroid through the armpit, [Dr. David] Terris said.

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First Trans-oral and Trans-vaginal Gallbladder Removals Performed in Human Trial

(Science Daily) Santiago Horgan, MD…, removed the gallbladder of a patient through the mouth and John Romanelli, MD…, removed the gallbladder of a patient through the vagina as part of the NOSCAR® human trials. NOTES® is performed by using the patient's natural openings for surgery. These human trials are the first in the world comparing oral and transvaginal NOTES® to traditional laparoscopy…

The growing capabilities of therapeutic flexible endoscopy have ushered in a new era in treatment of gastrointestinal conditions. Refinements in laparoscopic surgery have progressed to the point that complex surgical procedures, such as gastric bypass, can now be performed in a minimally invasive fashion. These trends have set the stage for the development of even less invasive methods to treat conditions in both the gut lumen and in the peritoneal cavity.

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UK study: wealthier is not necessarily healthier

(Reuters) The suggestion by one of U.S. President Barack Obama's key economic advisers that wealthier nations are also healthier is not necessarily true, according to a team of British social scientists…

Their findings suggest the idea is over-simplistic, they said, and in some cases the health of a population has worsened even as the country's national income was rising…

"According to these results, focusing on growth rather than poverty reduction and reducing inequality may lead to substantial loss of life."

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Want to Slow Aging? New Research Suggests It Takes More Than Antioxidants

(Science Daily) Don't put down the red wine and vitamins just yet, but if you're taking antioxidants because you hope to live longer, consider this: a new study … casts doubt on the theory that oxidative stress to our tissues shortens lifespan.

That's because researchers from McGill University in Canada have identified mutations in 10 different genes of worms (genes believed to have counterparts in humans) that extend their lifespan without reducing the level of oxidative stress the worms suffer. The results contradict the popular theory that production of toxic reactive oxygen species in tissues is responsible for aging.

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Community: Well, we’ll see. This study could be an anomaly. Besides, just yesterday we found out that antioxidants help arteries stay healthy.

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Glucosamine Ineffective for Lower Back Pain Linked to Arthritis

(HealthDay News) The popular supplement glucosamine offers little or no relief for sufferers of chronic lower back pain caused by osteoarthritis, a new study finds.

The Norwegian trial seems to be another knock against glucosamine, with other recent studies showing similar results.

"The study answer the questions: 'I have suffered low back pain for a long time (more than 6 months), will a 6-month intake of glucosamine help me?'" said lead researcher Philip Wilkens… "And the answer according to this study is no."

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Community: Again, we’ll have to see. I could barely walk before I started taking glucosamine.

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Brain's Energy Restored During Sleep, Suggests Animal Study

(Science Daily) In the initial stages of sleep, energy levels increase dramatically in brain regions found to be active during waking hours, according to new research… These results suggest that a surge of cellular energy may replenish brain processes needed to function normally while awake.

A good night's rest has clear restorative benefits, but evidence of the actual biological processes that occur during sleep has been elusive…

"This research provides intriguing evidence that a sleep-dependent energy surge is needed to facilitate the restorative biosynthetic processes," said Robert Greene, MD, PhD…, a sleep expert who was unaffiliated with the study.

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