A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

A Sense of Humor Helps Keep You Healthy Until Retirement Age

(Science Daily) A sense of humor helps to keep people healthy and increases their chances of reaching retirement age. But after the age of 70, the health benefits of humor decrease, researchers … have found…

"There is reason to believe that sense of humor continues to have a positive effect on mental health and social life, even after people have become retirees, although the positive effect on life expectancy could not be shown after the age of 75. At that point, genetics and biological aging are of greater importance," says project leader Professor Sven Svebak.

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Community: Fortunately, there are ways to fight the genetic and biological factors, as well.

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Feeling sluggish? Bad mood? Go outside.

(UPI) Those needing an energy boost and improved mood should spend some time every day outside, U.S. researchers found.

"Nature is fuel for the soul," lead author Richard Ryan, a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester in New York, said in a statement.

"Often when we feel depleted we reach for a cup of coffee, but research suggests a better way to get energized is to connect with nature."

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Sunblock for the eyes

(UPI) Two U.S. ophthalmologists remind summer outdoor enthusiasts the eyes need protection from overexposure to the sun…

"There are strong indications that chronic exposure to the components of sunlight may accelerate aging of ocular tissues," [Dr. Stephen] Trokel says in a statement. "Any protective eyewear should have side shield protection or wrap around the eye so light cannot enter the eye from side reflections."…

[The researchers] recommend sunglasses have more than 95 percent ultraviolet protection. They also advise a dark tint is not necessarily best -- lens tint should block at least 80 percent of transmissible light but not more than 90 percent to 92 percent. Neutral gray, amber, brown or green are good colors, they say.

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Study: Exercise could raise grades

(UPI) Twenty minutes of brisk physical exercise daily could improve your grade point average, U.S. researchers said.

A study by the American College of Sports Medicine found college students who exercised 20 minutes a day had grade point averages about .4 higher, on a scale of 4.0, compared with students who did not exercise, CNN reported Friday.

The results suggest exercise reduces stress, improves performance and increases a sense of well-being, said Joshua Ode, who supervised the study.

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Community: Exercise helps us older folks retain our cognitive abilities, too.

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Help for Women Runners With Knee Pain

(HealthDay News) Hip exercises can reduce a common type of knee pain in female runners, according to a new study.

Patellofemoral pain (PFP) occurs when the thigh bone rubs against the back of the knee cap. Typically, pain doesn't occur when someone with PFP first starts a run. But once the pain begins, it gets increasingly worse. The pain disappears almost immediately after the person stops running…

The exercise program reduced and, in some cases, eliminated knee pain, according to … researchers.

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Estrogen-like lignan diet, less breast cancer linked

(Reuters Health) Postmenopausal women who eat foods rich in estrogen-like plant chemicals called lignans may have a modestly decreased risk of developing breast cancer, a research review suggests.

In an analysis of 21 studies published in the past 13 years, researchers found that postmenopausal women who reported the highest intakes of dietary lignans were 14 percent less likely to develop breast cancer than those with low intakes…

Flaxseed and sesame are particularly high in lignans, and the compounds are also found in whole grains, berries and some other fruits, a number of vegetables such as broccoli and kale, and green tea.

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Meat, fish protein linked to women's bowel disease

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Eating lots of animal protein appears to increase women's risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a new study from France.

"Our results may help better understand the role of diet in IBD risk," Dr. Franck Carbonnel … and his team write… "If confirmed, they can lead to protective strategies, especially in families at risk of IBD, and possibly to advice for preventing relapse."

Inflammatory bowel disease is a collective term for diseases characterized by severe inflammation in the digestive system such as ulcerative colitis, which typically only affects the colon, and Crohn's disease, which can attack the entire digestive tract. IBD, which affects about one in 500 people.

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MyRecipes.com

Peanut-Crusted Chicken with Pineapple Salsa

Pick up a container of fresh pineapple chunks in the produce section of the supermarket; chop into half-inch pieces for the salsa. Serve with steamed broccoli and warm rolls to complete the dinner.

5 to Try: Italian Classics

Portion Control and Weight Loss

Beginner's Guide to Barbecuing Meat

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Low-Dose HRT Patch May Lessen Stroke Risk

(HealthDay News) Getting low-dose hormone replacement therapy through a skin patch may reduce a woman's risk for stroke, but high-dose patches could actually raise the risk, a new study suggests.

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New Gene Therapy Proves Effective in Treating Severe Heart Failure

(Science Daily) Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have developed a new gene therapy that is safe and effective in reversing advanced heart failure. SERCA2a (produced as MYDICAR®) is a gene therapy designed to stimulate production of an enzyme that enables the failing heart to pump more effectively. In a Phase II study, SERCA2a injection through a routine minimally invasive cardiac catheterization was safe and showed clinical benefit in treating this patient population and decreasing the severity of heart failure…

The [trial] is funded by Celladon Corporation, makers of MYDICAR.

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Physicists, medical researchers to team up on cancer

(Reuters) Particle physicists and medical scientists are to combine efforts to develop early detection techniques and advanced treatments for cancer as spin-offs from research into the origins and make-up of the universe.

The CERN European nuclear research organization, home to the world's largest particle collider, the LHC, said on Thursday the program would explore new ways of fighting cancer by ensuring doctors and physicists work together rather than in isolation.

The program will focus on high-resolution imaging that can spot tumors in their early stages, and the overall effects on the human body of particle therapy for cancer, and other topics, CERN said in a statement.

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Deficit panel eyes another bite at healthcare

(Reuters) Concern over rising U.S. debt could force lawmakers to take another crack at reining in healthcare costs long before any promised savings from President Barack Obama's sweeping overhaul are realized…

It is unclear how much more can be squeezed out of Medicare given the uncertainties and political realities surrounding the overhaul. But a fiscal commission asked by Obama to recommend ways to reduce the deficit and slow the growth of U.S. debt plans to tackle the issue.

"It is the biggest issue. There is no question," said Erskine Bowles, co-chairman of the commission…

Whatever the deficit commission recommends, Democratic Congressman Xavier Becerra, a member of the panel, said in an interview that it is important budget cutters keep in mind the human face behind the numbers.

"What I am concerned about is that we are going to do this number crunching in a sterile environment that doesn't take into account the reality of day to day life for Americans," he said.

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Community: Isn’t it odd that concern over the rising U.S. debt never, ever, brings up the topic of how much money we are wasting on foreign wars?

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Gulf Oil Spill Workers Report Health Problems

(HealthDay News) With the giant oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico now in its sixth week, reports of clean-up workers falling ill are on the rise…

More than a dozen workers have been treated at local medical centers for flu-like symptoms ranging from chest pain to dizziness, nausea and headaches, presumably due to exposure to different chemicals emanating from the slick, according to news reports.

The Unified Command in Louisiana -- a coalition of government agencies that includes the U.S. Coast Guard, the Department of the Interior and the National Parks Service -- last week called back to shore 125 boats helping with the clean-up after medical complaints from crew members.

"The reports that we've heard from hospitals and doctors have been [that the symptoms are due to] inhaled irritant exposure, but they've not gone so far as to say what exactly they think the responsible agent might be," Solomon said. "The workers are widely blaming the dispersants."

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Avoid cardiac event during summer exercise

(UPI) Hot weather exercise can lead to dehydration, exhaustion and even a cardiac event, a U.S. physician cautions.

Dr. Holly Andersen, director of education and outreach at the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York, does not advise giving up exercise in the summer, but suggests doing it safely…

Andersen's recommendations include:

-- Consulting a physician about a planned exercise regimen.

-- Exercising in a cool, air-conditioned indoor space or taking advantage of cooler, early morning and evening hours…

-- Drinking plenty of water, even before feeling thirsty. Endurance athletes, those prone to lightheadedness or those age 75 and older should replenish electrolytes…

-- Pacing yourself. Include time for breaks.

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Trekking-Poles Help Hikers Maintain Muscle Function While Reducing Soreness

(Science Daily) A study by academics at Northumbria University has shown for the first time that trekking-poles help hikers maintain muscle function while significantly reducing soreness in the days following a hike…

"The results present strong evidence that trekking poles reduce, almost to the point of complete disappearance, the extent of muscle damage during a day's mountain trek," says Dr Glyn Howatson, who conducted the study.

"Preventing muscle damage and soreness is likely to improve motivation and so keep people enjoying the benefits of exercise for longer. Perhaps even more advantageously, the combined benefits of using trekking poles in reducing load to the lower limbs, increasing stability and reducing muscle damage could also help avoid injury on subsequent days trekking."

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Exercise advised for cancer patients

(UPI) Some U.S. physicians say cancer exercise rehabilitation programs should be as common as cardiac rehabilitation programs.

Kathryn Schmitz … led [an] expert panel that developed the new cancer exercise guidelines after reviewing and evaluating the safety and efficacy of exercise during and after cancer treatment…

"We now have a compelling body of high-quality evidence that exercise during and after treatment is safe and beneficial for these patients, even those undergoing complex procedures such as stem cell transplants."

Cancer patients and survivors should try to get the same 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise weekly -- swimming to yoga to strength training -- the same as recommended for the general public, the panel said.

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New Evidence That Chili Pepper Ingredient Fights Fat

(Science Daily) Scientists are reporting new evidence that capsaicin, the stuff that gives chili peppers their kick, may cause weight loss and fight fat buildup by triggering certain beneficial protein changes in the body…

[T]he scientists fed high-fat diets with or without capsaicin to lab rats used to study obesity. The capsaicin-treated rats lost 8 percent of their body weight and showed changes in levels of at least 20 key proteins found in fat. The altered proteins work to break down fats. "These changes provide valuable new molecular insights into the mechanism of the antiobesity effects of capsaicin," the scientists say.

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Mediterranean diet helps existing heart disease, too

(Reuters Health) Eating a Mediterranean-style diet can help heart patients stay healthy, new research from Greece shows.

This eating pattern, which includes lots of fruits and vegetables, nuts, vegetable oils, low-fat dairy products, legumes, whole grains, and fish, has been shown to help shield people from heart disease and may also ward off certain cancers, Dr. Christina Chrysohoou of the University of Athens and her colleagues note in their report…

But patients with the most Mediterranean-style diets [who had suffered heart attacks or severe chest pain] were at 31 percent lower risk of suffering another heart attack or experiencing chest pain during the first month after they were discharged from the hospital.

They were only half as likely as those with the least Mediterranean eating habits to have another heart-related event within a year, and nearly 40 percent less likely to experience repeat heart problems within two years.

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Recipes.com

Walnut and Rosemary Oven-Fried Chicken
Get the crispy taste of fried chicken for less than 300 calories. Add kid appeal to this dish with a honey-mustard dipping sauce.

Mouthwatering Barbecue Sauces

7 Ways With Baking Potatoes

Easy Dinner Salads

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Marmots Can Teach Us About Obesity

(Science Daily) A nutrient that's common to all living things can make hibernating marmots hungry -- a breakthrough that could help scientists understand human obesity and eating disorders, according to a new study by a Colorado State University biologist…

Without this artificial stimulation, awake, hibernating marmots do not eat -- even when researchers place food in front of them…

[Professor Greg] Florant said he'll conduct additional research this summer to determine whether the reverse is true: Can he stop the animals from eating when they're not hibernating?

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Calcium Supplements: Too Much of a Good Thing?

(Science Daily) Negative health effects linked to taking too much supplemental calcium are on the rise, according to [scientists]… The incidence of the so-called milk-alkali or calcium-alkali syndrome is growing in large part because of widespread use of over-the-counter calcium and vitamin D supplements…

In many cases, patients with the syndrome require hospitalization…

According to the authors, the obvious preventive strategy against the calcium-alkali syndrome is to limit the intake of calcium to no more than 1.2 to 1.5 grams per day. "Calcium supplements taken in the recommended amounts are not only safe but are quite beneficial. Taken to excess is the problem," said Dr. [Stanley] Goldfarb. "Even at the recommended dose, careful monitoring of any medication is wise and yearly determinations of blood calcium levels for those patients taking calcium supplements or vitamin D is a wise approach," he added.

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Statins: Unintended adverse effects

(UPI) British researchers caution patients on statins -- which lower cholesterol -- should be monitored for unintended adverse effects.

Researchers … said some statins have been linked to an increased risk of liver dysfunction, acute kidney failure, muscle inflammation and cataracts.

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Antidepressant linked to cataracts

(UPI) Seniors who take a type of antidepressants may have increased risk of developing cataracts, a researcher in Canada suggests.

The study … finds selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants appears to increase cataract risk by about 15 percent.

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Study confirms link between migraines and stroke

(Reuters Health) People who suffer migraines are about twice as likely as people without the painful headaches to suffer a stroke caused by a blood clot, a new research review finds.

The analysis, which combined the results of 21 previous studies, confirms a connection between migraines and ischemic stroke -- the most common form of stroke, occurring when a clot disrupts blood flow to the brain.

Across the studies, migraine sufferers were about twice as likely to suffer an ischemic stroke as people without migraines.

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More Than Quarter of Stroke Patients Reach ER Within 'Golden Hour'

(HealthDay News) Researchers report that only about a quarter of people who have strokes caused by blocked arteries arrive at a hospital within one hour of the attack -- the "golden hour" where treatment with a powerful clot-dissolving drug is expected to work best.

The report also notes that only one in four of patients who do arrive within an hour go on to get the potentially lifesaving therapy, called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)…

Why do so many patients not receive tPA, even if they arrive at the hospital relatively soon? According to [Dr. Jeffrey L.] Saver, there are a number of necessary steps that have to be gone through before the treatment can be given…

Several measures are being taken to speed that evaluation process, Saver said. One is to have paramedics in the ambulance call ahead to alert the hospital about the probable need for stroke treatment.

Another effort is aimed at raising public awareness of stroke symptoms and what should be done when they occur, said Dr. Ralph S. Sacco.

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1 in 4 Patients Undergoes Revolving-Door Hospitalizations

(HealthDay News) About one-quarter of all U.S. hospital patients are readmitted over a two-year period for the same conditions that led to their original hospitalization, a new study finds.

These revolving-door figures came from the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality…

Although some patients do need to be readmitted, better outpatient care could prevent unnecessary repeat hospital admissions, which in turn can push up health care costs, according to the AHRQ.

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Drug Errors Peak in July When New Docs Start

(HealthDay News) Fatal medication errors in U.S. hospitals peak in July, possibly because of the inexperience of new medical residents, a new study finds.

Thousands begin their medical residencies in July, and those first weeks may be a dangerous time for patients in teaching hospitals, suggest researchers.

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Firm loses a ton of weight, literally

(UPI) Employees of a Rochester, N.Y., firm have lost a ton of weight -- actually 2,093 pounds to be exact, company officials said.

As part of an overall wellness initiative that includes smoking cessation, stress management, nutrition education and a health fair, North American Breweries began a company-wide weight loss challenge last January for employees divided into teams of four…

The weight loss will help improve the health of the employees [and] reduce healthcare costs for the company…

"Working together to improve our health has helped to boost morale and healthy competition among employees," Bill Neilson, vice president of people and management systems at North American Breweries, said in a statement.

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Many see workplace key to getting healthy

(UPI) Many U.S. companies say newly enacted healthcare reform legislation will not by itself will make for a healthier America, a survey indicates…

More than 62 percent of the 1,012 employer respondents … say the workplace must play a leading role in helping develop a healthier workforce…

Almost 75 percent of employees say they would be more apt to adopt healthful lifestyle behaviors if their colleagues did as well, while 60 percent say they would adopt such behaviors if company executives were leading by example.

The survey, released to mark the start of National Employee Wellness Month in June, was conducted April 14-29 via e-mail.

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Clean House Linked to Better Fitness

(HealthDay News) People with tidy homes are more likely to be physically active than those with messy dwellings…

The findings suggest that something about the condition of a person's home affects levels of physical activity or that people get exercise while they keep their homes clean.

"Are the types of people who take care of their bodies the same types of people who take care of their homes?" [associate professor of physical education NiCole] Keith wondered.

The study may point to new ways to promote physical activity.

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Meditation Reduces the Emotional Impact of Pain, Study Finds

(Science Daily) People who meditate regularly find pain less unpleasant because their brains anticipate the pain less, a new study has found…

The study … found that particular areas of the brain were less active as meditators anticipated pain, as induced by a laser device. Those with longer meditation experience (up to 35 years) showed the least anticipation of the [pain]…

[Said Dr Christopher Brown:] "The results of the study confirm how we suspected meditation might affect the brain. Meditation trains the brain to be more present-focused and therefore to spend less time anticipating future negative events. This may be why meditation is effective at reducing the recurrence of depression, which makes chronic pain considerably worse."

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Depression therapy, drugs similar results

(UPI) A U.S. survey by Consumer Reports indicates people with depression report similar results from talk therapy and medication…

Survey respondents, who had at least seven sessions of talk therapy, report as much improvement as those who took medication, but those who did both therapy and medication fared even better, Consumer Reports says.

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Grandpa's Decision-Making Skills May Be Just Fine

(HealthDay News) Conventional wisdom says older people make less risky -- and less sound -- decisions, but now a new study suggests otherwise.

In some cases, older people make just as good, or even better, money-making decisions than younger people, researchers report.

"It's not age, per se, that's causing people to become more risk-averse," said study co-author Scott A. Huettel…

But two cognitive factors -- age-related declines in memory and the ability to process information quickly -- can influence the ability of older people to make decisions, he said…

The findings suggest that older people might make better decisions if they have more time for their brains to process details, he said.

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Probiotic Found in Breast Milk Helps Alleviate Symptoms of Digestive Disorders

(Science Daily) Canadian researchers have discovered how a probiotic found in breastmilk reduces or eliminates painful cramping in the gut… [T]hese scientists use mice to show that a specific strain of Lactobacillus reuteri decreases the force of muscle contractions in the gut within minutes of exposure. This bacterium naturally occurs in the gut of many mammals and can be found in human breast milk. This discovery suggests that increasing the intake of this bacterium may help alleviate symptoms of a wide range of gut disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, functional bowel disorders, and constipation.

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Recipes

Cooking Light:

Foods for Fitness
We asked a certified sports trainer and registered dietitian for her favorite pre- and post-workout recipes. Here's what to eat throughout the day for both energy and recovery.

Superfast Appetizers
Whether it's a quick get-together with friends or a formal cocktail party, these 20-minute recipes will whet the appetite.

20-minute Chicken
These chicken dishes come from all over the world, but none take more than 20 minutes to prepare.

MyRecipes.com:

Pork Chops with Bourbon-Peach Sauce
This Southern-style entrée is a one-pan dish that's sure to impress guests. Serve with steamed asparagus to round out the meal.

Ground Beef Recipes Under 300 Calories

Our 25 Most Popular Chicken Recipes

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Peaches, Plums Induce Deliciously Promising Death of Breast Cancer Cells

(Science Daily) Breast cancer cells -- even the most aggressive type -- died after treatments with peach and plum extracts in lab tests at Texas AgriLife Research recently, and scientists say the results are deliciously promising. Not only did the cancerous cells keel over, but the normal cells were not harmed in the process…

A closer look at the extracts determined that two specific phenolic acid components -- chlorogenic and neochlorogenic -- were responsible for killing the cancer cells while not affecting the normal cells, [Dr. Luis] Cisneros-Zevallos said…

The work documenting the health benefits of stone fruit has been supported by the Vegetable and Fruit Improvement Center at Texas A&M University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the California Tree Fruit Agreement.

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Longer Drug Regimen Still Best Against Breast Cancer

(HealthDay News) For patients with early stage breast cancer, taking chemotherapy drugs sequentially over six months helps improve their survival compared to taking them at the same time over a shorter three-month span, a new study found…

But the "most exciting and surprising finding," said study lead author Dr. Sandra M. Swain, was that younger women who went into early menopause because of their chemotherapy -- in other words, those who stopped having periods -- were more likely to live longer…

And this was true irrespective of whether the women's cancers were estrogen-receptor positive (meaning estrogen furthers their growth) or not.

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Bone Drug Suppresses Wandering Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients; May Reduce Metastatic Disease

(Science Daily) The bone-strengthening drug zoledronic acid (Zometa) can help fight metastatic breast cancer when given before surgery, suggests research…

When the drug was given along with chemotherapy for three months before breast cancer surgery, it reduced the number of women who had tumor cells in their bone marrow at the time of surgery.

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Pain Med May Affect Breast Cancer Recurrence

(HealthDay News) The painkiller a woman takes after a mastectomy may influence the odds of breast cancer recurrence, a new study suggests.

Researchers … in Belgium looked for links between painkiller use and breast cancer recurrence in 327 women from one to four years after they underwent a mastectomy.

Women who received a powerful prescription painkiller called ketorolac (sold as Toradol and Acular) which is related to aspirin and ibuprofen, were less likely to develop a recurrence of breast cancer. Their rate was 6 percent compared to 17 percent for those who received other drugs for pain.

The link between the drug and lower rate of recurrence remained even after the researchers adjusted for factors such as patient age and stage of cancer.

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Drug Combo Staves Off Type 2 Diabetes

(HealthDay News) In people with pre-diabetes, a low-dose combination of two diabetes drugs -- metformin and Avandia (rosiglitazone) -- appeared to reduce the progression to type 2 diabetes, new research shows.

The study found that the risk of developing type 2 diabetes was reduced by two-thirds in those taking the drug combo compared to those on placebo.

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Deep Brain Stimulation Works in Two Sites for Parkinson's Disease

(HealthDay News) People suffering from Parkinson's disease can benefit from deep brain stimulation in either one of two sites in the brain, a new study finds.

The Veterans Affairs researchers compared two different targets in the brain for deep brain stimulation -- the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus interna (GPi) -- both of which affect motor function…

"The decision as to which target in the brain to stimulate to treat Parkinson's disease should consider the other symptoms and problems of Parkinson's disease," [researcher Frances ] Weaver said. For example, the use of medications can be reduced to a greater extent after STN stimulation than GPi stimulation, she noted.

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Synthetic Peptide May Regenerate Brain Tissue in Stroke Victims

(Science Daily) A synthetic version of a naturally occurring peptide promoted the creation of new blood vessels and repaired damaged nerve cells in lab animals, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit…

In the latest study, adult rats were dosed with Thymosin beta 4 one day after they were subjected to a blockage in the cerebral artery, then given four more doses, once every three days. Rats treated only with saline were used as a control group.

After eight weeks, the Thymosin beta 4 group showed significant overall improvement compared to the control group.

The researchers concluded that the peptide improved blood vessel density as well as promoted a certain type of immature brain cells called oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes, which produces myelin to protect axons in nerve cells.

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Are the Unemployed Required to Buy Insurance?

(Prescriptions, New York Times) Q. How does the [new health care law] work for someone who is unemployed? Will they be required to purchase insurance on the exchanges? — Dan, Denver.

A. In general, everyone is required to have insurance starting in 2014, even people who are unemployed. But you’ll be exempt from the requirement if your income is below the tax-filing threshold (in 2009, that amount was $9,350 for singles under age 65), or if buying even the lowest cost plan on the new health insurance exchanges, set to open that year, would exceed 8 percent of your income.

If you have no income or just a small amount, you may be eligible for coverage under Medicaid, which was expanded under the new health law to cover adults with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, or about $14,400 this year.

If you can afford to look for insurance on the exchanges, subsidies will be available for people with incomes up to 400 percent of the poverty level ($43,320 in 2010).

Read more.

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More Cancer-Causing Chemicals in U.S. Cigarettes

(HealthDay News) American cigarettes could pack a more toxic punch than foreign brands, say researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention…

In fact, the amount of tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) in U.S. brands is about triple that of brands from Australia, Canada or the United Kingdom, [researchers] said.

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Chocolate may cut cholesterol but only in some people: study

(Reuters Life!) Eating chocolate could bring down cholesterol levels -- but only in small amounts and only in some people, according to an analysis of eight studies.

Dr. Rutai Hui of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College in Beijing and colleagues found chocolate only helped people who already had risk factors for heart disease and only when consumed in modest amounts.

Eating moderate amounts of cocoa could be "a worthwhile dietary approach" for preventing high cholesterol in certain groups of people, the researchers concluded.

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After a point, more omega-3s don't help the heart

(Reuters Health) Memo to adults with heart disease: If you're already eating a fair amount of fish and taking omega-3 fatty acid supplements, the extra boost may not be doing much to help your heart.

New research suggests that only patients with very low daily intake of certain omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish and some plants and nuts, are likely to reduce their risk of heart attacks or death if they take more supplements rich in these fatty acids.

The study supports research which has shown that, after a certain point, omega-3 supplements may not do much for the heart.

Read more.

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MyRecipes.com

Arugula, Italian Tuna, and White Bean Salad
This no-cook dinner recipe is packed with colorful vegetables and gets a flavor kick from its zesty vinaigrette.

New! "Ask the Expert" Blog

Summer Pasta Salads

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5 Dining-Out Strategies

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Going out to dinner tonight? The best way to eat healthy and still enjoy the foods you love is to consider some smart strategies beforehand. Why? According to a study by the American College of Cardiology, most people consume an additional 500 calories when dining out… Here are some easy ways to avoid overdoing it at a restaurant:

1. Just say no to the bread basket

2. Load up on veggies

3. Stick to lean protein

4. Consider your beverages.
Skip the mixed drink or cocktail and order a nonalcoholic beverage, such as water, club soda with a twist, diet soda, or unsweetened iced tea…

5. Enjoy dessert
Simply employ the South Beach Diet "3-Bite Rule": Order the dessert that is tantalizing you — along with enough forks for your tablemates. Then, savor a few bites and pass the plate to your fellow diners. You’ll soon see that enjoying just three bites of a delicious dessert is enough to satisfy your sweet tooth.

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Tracking PSA Test Results Over Time Gives Clues to Cancer

(HealthDay News) Doctors could do a better job of assessing the severity of prostate cancer by analyzing changes in prostate-specific antigen(PSA) blood tests over time, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Innsbruck, Austria, report that the rate of increase in PSA, based on a factor known as velocity, can strongly predict whether a man has a high-risk form of cancer…

"Further analysis of these changes improves the specificity of the PSA test and can help us better decide when biopsy and active treatment might be necessary. It helps make PSA a smarter test."

Read more.

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Dog Sniffs Out Prostate Cancer in Small Study

(HealthDay News) New research suggests that dogs can sniff out signs of prostate cancer in human urine, adding to the ongoing debate over the disease-detecting powers of man's best friend.

Some scientists have questioned similar reports of dogs with such diagnostic powers in recent years, but the lead author of this latest study said the findings are promising and could lead to better cancer-sensing technology.

"The dogs are certainly recognizing the odor of a molecule that is produced by cancer cells," said French researcher Jean-Nicolas Cornu…

[T]he report could represent a significant development since cancer often goes undetected until it is too late to treat.

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