A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

Other People's Cell Phone Conversations Really ARE Annoying

(HealthDay News) If you've ever wanted to shout "shut up!" while listening to someone else's cell phone conversation in an elevator, train or restaurant, new research reveals why.

Overhearing one-sided conversations really is more annoying because the brain finds it more taxing, and therefore more distracting, to listen to only half of a conversation versus the whole thing.

"It's unbelievably irritating to overhear someone on a cell phone," said lead study author Lauren Emberson, a doctoral candidate in psychology at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. "It's harder to tune out, you can't pull your attention away from it and you're more distracted by it."

Read more.

Community: People with the most annoying voices are the ones who talk the loudest, it seems.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Online Program Helps Patients Self-Monitor Blood Pressure

(HealthDay News) An online blood-pressure monitoring program made a major difference in health management for patients with uncontrolled hypertension, new research has found…

Those who took part in the online program transmitted blood pressure readings via a home computer to their physicians. Pharmacy specialists reviewed the numbers and adjusted the medications of the patients accordingly, the study authors explained.

After six months, 58 percent of those in the program had lowered their blood pressure to healthy levels, compared to just 38 percent of those in the other group, Dr. David Magid of Kaiser Permanente Colorado and colleagues found.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Increased Cancer Risk of People With Type 2 Diabetes, Large Study Finds

(Science Daily) Cancer and diabetes -- are risk factors the same for these two diseases? Or does diabetes cause processes in the body which promote the onset or growth of cancer? It is still unclear why diabetics have a higher rate of cancer than people who are not affected by this metabolic disorder.

In order to precisely identify the types of cancer in which diabetes plays a role, Kari Hemminki of DKFZ collaborated with colleagues in Sweden and the United States to carry out the largest study ever on cancer risks of people with type 2 diabetes…

The researchers discovered that people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing 24 of the types of cancer studied. The most significant risk elevation was established for pancreatic and liver cell cancers…

In addition, the study confirmed an observation suggesting that people with type 2 diabetes have a significantly lower rate of prostate cancer.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Exercise May Keep Cancer Patients Healthier During, After Treatment

(Science Daily) Breast and prostate cancer patients who regularly exercise during and after cancer treatment report having a better quality of life and being less fatigued, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

"Using exercise as an approach to cancer care has the potential to benefit patients both physically and psychologically, as well as mitigate treatment side effects," says study lead author Eleanor M. Walker, M.D…

"Plus, exercise is a great alternative to patients combating fatigue and nausea who are considering using supplements which may interfere with medications and chemotherapy they're taking during cancer treatment."

Read more.

Community: Start exercising BEFORE you get cancer, and you may not get it at all.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

When you hurt too much, you eat too much.

(Roger Gould, M.D., ShrinkYourself.com) I have described in the last several blogs how rebellion, self doubt, marriage, guilt, and perfectionism can cause you to overeat and or binge. I have said it before, ANY life frustration can be the trigger that makes you eat too much. And what makes you eat too much one day will be different than what makes you eat too much on another day. This can be disappointing if you are hoping to find and fix that ONE trigger that explains it all.

But if you look closer at yourself there IS something that ties it all together. It is not out there where things happen to you. It is inside you. The common denominator is the way YOUR mind and body responds to the frustrating triggers of a complex life…

Unless you change this pattern, you won’t be able to control your eating. “Emergencies” will always trump your best intentions, and it’s only a matter of time until you just give up in the face of this mysterious other part of you that clicks in and takes over…

You have to prove to yourself that no disaster will occur if you interrupt this reflex long enough to pause and start thinking about what is bothering you. You have to prove this to yourself, over and over again, until you are absolutely sure that it is true…

Think of it as like recovering from knee surgery. It's painful to start stretching and walking at first, and becomes easier until you have recovered your full function at which time there is no pain at all.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

The 7 Best Greens for You

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Research shows that eating dark greens may help maintain good health by reducing your risk of heart disease, some cancers, and several other illnesses. They're also rich in beta-carotene, and vitamins C and E, which help protect against free radicals (unstable oxygen molecules that can damage cells), as well as the B vitamin folate and vitamin K. Eating dark greens regularly may also lower blood pressure and cholesterol, promote normal eyesight, and improve gastrointestinal function.

Include these seven nutritional powerhouses in your diet:

  • spinach
  • broccoli
  • kale
  • Swiss chard
  • romaine and red-leaf lettuce
  • bok choy
  • brussels sprouts

The most recent dietary guidelines published by the US Department of Health and Human Services recommend consuming at least three cups of dark-green vegetables per week, but if you're like most Americans, you don't get even this amount… The good news: All vegetables contribute to a healthy eating plan. So eat a wide variety, both green and otherwise, throughout the week, and you'll take a big step toward gaining many of the nutrients your body needs.

Source

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

All About Strawberries

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Whether you’re enjoying strawberries with your breakfast, using them to prepare vinaigrette for your salad, or garnishing a healthy dessert, these plump, sweet berries are delicious with many meals. Strawberries are rich in dietary fiber and offer a good amount of vitamin C, more than any other berry in fact. Strawberries are at their peak from April through July, but they are usually available year-round in supermarkets…

Buying Strawberries: Strawberries do not ripen any further once they’ve been picked, so it’s best to use them within a few days of purchase. Avoid choosing strawberries that are dull in color, have green or yellow splotches or mold on the skin, or have berry stains on the bottom of the box…

Storing Strawberries: Be sure to discard any mushy or overripe strawberries since they may cause others to spoil more quickly. Don't rinse the berries until you're ready to eat them — washing them ahead of time will also lead to spoilage. Properly store and chill strawberries in the refrigerator at 40°F. To freeze strawberries, spread them out in a single layer on a cookie sheet and put them in the freezer. Once they are frozen, transfer the berries into a plastic bag and place them back into the freezer, where they can be kept for up to a year.

Enjoying Strawberries: When you're ready to eat your berries, rinse them well with water (to remove any pesticide residue) with the leafy cap intact. (Removing the cap before washing will cause the berries to absorb water.) Using a paring knife, remove the leafy cap and the white "hull." Once cleaned and cut, strawberries are delicious eaten on their own, as a topping for low-fat or nonfat plain yogurt, or served with whole-grain, high-fiber cereal. As an occasional treat, try them dipped in a bit of melted dark chocolate.

Source

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Recipes

Cooking Light:

Summer Cookbook
These healthy recipes showcase the season's best foods.

Essential Grilling Guide
Some of the season's best―and easiest―recipes come sizzling off your grill. Choose your own menu from these favorite recipes

5-Ingredient Salads
Using ingredients you likely have on hand already, these entrée salads are easy, quick, and delicious.

MyRecipes.com:

Oatmeal-Crusted Chicken Tenders
Oatmeal-crusted chicken tenders are delightfully crunchy, and are sure to be a hit with adults and children alike. Serve with commercial honey mustard or light ranch dressing for dipping.

Must-Have Kitchen Essentials

Fabulous Fondue Party

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Better Way to Detect Food Allergies

(Science Daily) About 30 percent of Americans believe they have food allergies. However, the actual number is far smaller, closer to 5 percent, according to a recent study commissioned by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). That's due in large part to the unreliability of the skin test that doctors commonly use to test for food allergies.

MIT chemical engineer Christopher Love believes he has a better way to diagnose such allergies. His new technology … can analyze individual immune cells taken from patients, allowing for precise measurement of the cells' response to allergens such as milk and peanuts.

Using this technology, doctors could one day diagnose food allergies with a simple blood test that would be faster and more reliable than current tests, says Love.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Common Diabetes Drug Linked to Vitamin B-12 Deficiency

(HealthDay News) Diabetics who take the drug metformin over the long term should get their vitamin B-12 levels checked regularly to see if they are developing a vitamin deficiency, a new report suggests…

Failing to check patients' vitamin levels may lead doctors to improperly diagnose the symptoms of B-12 deficiency, which include fatigue, mental changes, anemia and neuropathy. Doctors may mistakenly think these symptoms are caused by diabetes or aging, the study authors noted.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Stroke Incidence Down, But Not for Blacks

(HealthDay News) The incidence of the most common form of stroke has decreased significantly among whites but has increased slightly among blacks, according to a new regional survey designed to be representative of the United States as a whole…

The most likely explanation for the overall decrease is better treatment of risk factors such as high blood pressure, obesity and high cholesterol levels, [study author Dr. Dawn Kleindorfer] said.

The reason for the difference between whites and blacks is also a matter of speculation, Kleindorfer said. "There are a lot of features that the survey cannot answer -- severity of the stroke, access to medical care, dietary differences," she said. "There are cultural differences, so completely teasing out the reasons would be challenging."

Blacks were more likely to have stroke risk factors, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, but were also more likely to be receiving treatment for them, the study found.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

When Heart Patients Discharge Themselves, Hospital Bills Increase

(HealthDay News) Hospital patients receiving treatment for heart disease who decide to discharge themselves before their doctors deem them ready end up costing hospitals more if and when they are readmitted…

The authors found that self-discharged patients ended up costing hospitals upwards of 9 percent more in treatment expenses than doctor-discharged patients.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Talk With Doctor Helps Heart Attack Patients Resume Sex

(HealthDay News) People who don't have a frank talk about sex with their doctor after they have had a heart attack are less likely to resume sexual activity, new research finds…

"Maybe there's something doctors can do to help maintain the previous level of activity," [Dr. Stacy Tessler] Lindau said. "Simply talk to them about when it is safe to resume sexual activity."

That talk should be a standard part of the hospital discharge routine, said Dr. Dan J. Fintel…

"The doctor should initiate discussions about return to normal life, about work, physical activity and eating habits," Fintel said. "Items of intimate nature, like sexual activity, should be on the list, but often are left off."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Medical Devices Driving Up Heart Care Costs

(HealthDay News) Costs for patients with chronic heart failure and coronary artery disease are going up because more physicians are turning to pricey, surgically implanted devices such as medically coated stents and cardioverter-defibrillators, a new report finds…

The researchers found that when adjusted for inflation, the average costs for coronary artery disease treatment grew from $12,160 in 2003 to $12,721 in 2006, while the cost for chronic heart failure patients went up from $17,153 to $18,371 in the same period.

The researchers also found that use of stents coated with medication boosted Medicare's overall cost for coronary artery disease in people aged 66-85 by $3.32 billion and by $774 million for chronic heart failure patients.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

A Live-Longer Strategy That Starts in Your Head

(RealAge.com) Want to live longer? Then you better have a really good idea of what you're living for.

In a study of older adults, those who lived a goal-driven life were 57 percent less likely to die during the 5-year study period -- compared with those who didn't have much direction or purpose…

Having a purpose in life was so helpful in a recent study that it even appeared to improve the longevity of people with depression, disabilities, chronic medical conditions, or financial difficulties.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

More Steps a Day Lead to Better Health

(HealthDay News) Walk a little, and your body will thank you. Walk a lot, and it will really thank you.

That's the message of a new study that links taking more steps in a day to a lower risk of an extremely common condition known as metabolic syndrome, which can lead to heart disease and diabetes.

The research only shows a connection between more walking and better health -- it doesn't prove that simply walking more will make you healthier. Still, the findings suggest that "you don't have to be out there running marathons," said study co-author Peter T. Katzmarzyk…

Instead, "you just have to incorporate physical activity such as walking into your lifestyle," he said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Just 5 Minutes of 'Green Exercise' Optimal for Good Mental Health

(Science Daily) Just five minutes of exercise in a park, working in a backyard garden, on a nature trail, or other green space will benefit mental health.

Jules Pretty and Jo Barton explain in the study that green exercise is physical activity in the presence of nature. Abundant scientific evidence shows that activity in natural areas decreases the risk of mental illness and improves the sense of well-being. Until now, however, nobody knew how much time people had to spend in green spaces to get those and other benefits.

"For the first time in the scientific literature, we have been able to show dose-response relationships for the positive effects of nature on human mental health," Pretty said.

A challenge for policy makers is that policy recommendations on physical activity are easily stated but rarely adopted widely as public policy, Pretty noted, adding that the economic benefits could be substantial.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Tai Chi Gets Cautious Thumbs Up for Psychological Health

(Science Daily) Tai Chi, a low impact martial art, has been associated with reduced stress, anxiety and depression, and enhanced mood, in both healthy people and those with chronic conditions. A systematic review of the subject … found that although Tai Chi does appear to have positive psychological effects, more high quality, randomized trials are needed…

[Dr. Chenchen] Wang and her colleagues found that practicing Tai Chi was associated with reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem. The quality of the studies identified was generally modest, however. In particular, rigorous, prospective, well controlled randomized trials with appropriate comparison groups and validated outcome measures are generally lacking.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Yoga Eases Sleep Problems Among Cancer Survivors

(HealthDay News) Cancer survivors who participated in a month-long program in the ancient art of yoga reported enhanced quality of life, better sleep, less fatigue and less need for sleep medications.

"This is a readily applicable approach that improves quality of life and reduces medicine intake in cancer survivors. This is a real positive," said Dr. Douglas W. Blayney.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Big Decline in Heart Attacks If All States Had Smoking Bans

(HealthDay News) If all states banned smoking in restaurants, offices and other public spaces nationwide, the number of Americans suffering from heart attacks would drop by more than 18,000 within the first year, researchers report…

For the study, the researchers looked at data from 13 states that do not have laws banning smoking in public places. In states without smoking bans there were 169,043 hospitalizations for heart attack, the researchers found.

Based on their calculations of an 11 percent drop in heart attacks if bans were instituted nationwide, there would be 18,596 fewer hospitalizations for heart attack in the first year.

In addition, there would be a savings of $92 million in costs of caring for these patients, the researchers said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

The Hidden Power in Corn

(RealAge.com) You know corn syrup is as bad as added sugar, and both have no redeeming benefit when added to (rather than being a natural part of) food. But we're still upbeat about corn as a fuel (for you, not cars). Giving it a spot in your veggie mix is a pretty good choice (in fact, having a wider variety of vegetables in your life than cable channels helps lower your RealAge).

Whole kernel or on the cob, corn's got something that can really sweeten your health. It's a potent phytochemical called ferulic acid. New research shows the compound helps you skirt a host of chronic conditions, from Alzheimer's disease to cancer.

You'll also find this super phenol in tomatoes and rice bran. When you get ferulic acid from any of these foods, it does a ton of good things for your body, like scavenging cell-damaging free radicals and diminishing plaque buildup in artery walls. And if all of that isn't enough -- it may help fight aging, too.

Corn's not just a one-trick pony. It also contains lutein, a nutrient that may help protect your eyes from aging. A half cup of the stuff contains a mere 66 calories and has a respectable 2 grams of fiber.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Add These to Your Sandwich to Stop Strokes

(RealAge.com) Onions are brimming with flavonols, and new research suggests that these nutritional goodies could downsize the risk of stroke by as much as 20 percent.

The key flavonol compounds for stroke prevention appear to be myricetin, apigenin, luteolin, kaempferol, and quercetin. But don't worry about pronouncing them. Just know that they have inflammation-cooling effects -- especially the quercetin -- and that translates into a lower risk of stroke-inducing blood clots. Flavonols also appear to relax and dilate blood vessels, another buffer against strokes.

Tea seems to be the major source for flavonols in many people's diets, but if you're not a tea drinker, no worries. Onions contain a much more bioavailable form than tea does. Or get your flavonol fix from apples, broccoli, dark leafy greens, or berries.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Recipes

MyRecipes.com:

Turkey Panini with Watercress and Citrus Aioli
Take your average turkey sandwich to the next level with a citrusy spread and a few minutes on the panini press

5 to Try: Hot Off the Grill

Chicken, Cashew, and Red Pepper Stir-Fry
This dish balances salty, sweet, tangy, and spicy ingredients. Spoon it alongside a quick rice pilaf.

Classic Beef Pot Roast

LifeScript.com:

7 Savory Burger Recipes
When the weather is hot, get out of the kitchen and outside to the grill. These 7 burger recipes are original in flavor and surprisingly healthy.

Crab Cake Burgers

Mediterranean Portobello Burger

Spicy Turkey Burgers with Pickled Onions

Fajita Burgers

Mozzarella-Stuffed Turkey Burgers

Spanish Pork Burgers

Wasabi Salmon Burgers

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Smart Snacks for the Office

(SouthBeachDiet.com) When the mid-morning or afternoon lull sets in at the office, do you find yourself reaching for something unhealthy to munch on? Snacking on the right foods at these times of day is encouraged … because it helps to normalize your blood-sugar levels. And diminishing swings in blood sugar helps to curb cravings and keep you on a successful weight-loss track. The best finger foods to have on hand? Cut-up veggies, nuts, part-skim cheese sticks, and … fruit are all great choices whenever you have the urge to snack. But there are many more options as well.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Abdominal Fat at Middle Age Associated With Greater Risk of Dementia

(Science Daily) Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine determined that excess abdominal fat places otherwise healthy, middle-aged people at risk for dementia later in life. Preliminary findings suggest a relationship between obesity and dementia that could lead to promising prevention strategies in the future…

"Our results confirm the inverse association of increasing BMI with lower brain volumes in older adults and with younger, middle-aged adults and extends the findings to a much larger study sample," noted Dr. [Sudha] Seshadri…

"More importantly our data suggests a stronger connection between central obesity, particularly the visceral fat component of abdominal obesity, and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease," Dr. Seshadri added.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

New Associations Between Diabetes, Environmental Factors Found by Novel Analytic Technique

(Science Daily) Got diabetes? If so, you probably know that the adult-onset form of the disease can be triggered by, among other things, obesity and a fatty diet. You're also more likely to develop diabetes if other family members have it. But a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests that you should also begin looking suspiciously at other aspects of your life -- like your past exposure to certain pesticides or chemicals and even one form of vitamin E.

In fact, the association of some of these so-called "environmental" cues with diabetes surpasses that of the best genetic markers scientists have identified for the disease…

The scientists are careful to caution, however, that an association doesn't necessarily mean that vitamin E or pollutants cause type-2 diabetes, and that more research is needed to fully understand these complex relationships.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

One-a-Day Heart Polypill to Be Tested in New International Trial

(Science Daily) Researchers will be exploring whether a new, very low cost, one-a-day combined 'polypill' could reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems across the world, in a major new international trial that has just launched…

The new 'Red Heart Pill' contains low-dose aspirin, a statin and two blood pressure-lowering medicines in a single polypill. It is expected to be substantially cheaper than existing medications to combat cardiovascular problems…

The researchers behind the trial will be investigating whether patients are more likely to stick with a preventive treatment regime using a single, one-a-day polypill, rather than multiple tablets. The researchers will also be exploring whether the Red Heart Pill is effective at reducing blood pressure and lowering cholesterol.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Statin Use Tied to Eye, Kidney, Liver Troubles

(HealthDay News) People taking cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins may be at heightened risk for liver dysfunction, acute kidney failure and cataracts, British researchers report…

On the more positive side, the study found no link between statin use and risks for a wide range of cancers (including stomach, colon, lung, renal, breast or prostate malignancies), as well as no connection to Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, blood clots, dementia or fractures.

And experts say that, given the drugs' well-known benefit in cutting heart disease risk, the new findings are no reason for patients to shy away from statins.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer Moves Closer

(HealthDay News) A step-wise approach accurately spots early stage ovarian cancer in older women at average risk for the disease, new research suggests.

This cancer is known as a silent killer because it is often diagnosed too late to be successfully treated. Scientists have long sought a reliable method of early detection.

The "Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm" (ROCA), which uses a mathematical model, is geared specifically to postmenopausal women at average risk for the disease.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Estrogen-Lowering Drugs Minimize Surgery in Breast Cancer Patients, Study Finds

(Science Daily) A nationwide study has confirmed the benefit of giving estrogen-lowering drugs before surgery to breast cancer patients. The treatment increased the likelihood that women could undergo breast-conservation surgery, also called lumpectomy, instead of mastectomy.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Medicalizing Human Conditions: A Growth Industry -- But What Does It Cost?

(Science Daily) Menopause. Normal pregnancy. Infertility. ADHD. Erectile dysfunction. Over the last several decades, these conditions have come to be defined and treated as medical problems. They've been "medicalized."… [R]esearchers used national data to estimate the costs of these and a handful of other common conditions on escalating U.S. healthcare spending…

The robust trend toward ever-greater medicalization of human conditions is undeniable, with an increasing number of medical diagnoses and treatments for behavioral problems and normal life events. [Brandeis sociologist Peter] Conrad and his colleagues analyzed medical spending on these disorders -- payments to hospitals, pharmacies, physicians and other health care providers -- and discovered that they accounted for $77.1 billion in medical spending in 2005 -- 3.9 percent of total domestic health care expenditures.

"We spend more on these medicalized conditions than on cancer, heart disease, or public health," said Conrad. "While medicalization is unlikely to be a key driver of skyrocketing health care costs, $77 billion represents a substantial dollar sum."

Read more.

Community: But there’s one human condition that, if treated and fought as a disease, could SAVE billions. Not to mention reduce huge amounts of human suffering. See below.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Is aging a disease?

(Reuters) It's clear that the simple fact of growing older -- chronological aging -- is relentless and unstoppable. But experts studying the science of aging say it's time for a fresh look at the biological process -- one which recognizes it as a condition that can be manipulated, treated and delayed.

Taking this new approach would turn the search for drugs to fight age-related diseases on its head, they say, and could speed the path to market of drugs that treat multiple illnesses like diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer's at the same time…

[Nir] Barzilai and many other scientists around the world are studying the genes of the very old and starting to find the genetic mechanisms, or pathways, that help them beat off the dementias, cancers, heart diseases and other age-related illnesses that bring down others who die younger.

By finding the genes thought to help determine longevity, scientists think they may be able to mimic their action to not only extend life span, but, crucially, extend health span.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Not enough fruits and vegetables to fight cancer

(Reuters) The United States does not produce or import anywhere near enough fruits and vegetables to provide Americans the right kind of diet to prevent cancer, government researchers said on Wednesday…

"If everyone wanted to eat healthily, there would not be enough," Susan Krebs-Smith of the [National Cancer Institute] told reporters…

"The fruit in the food supply is about half what it needs to be, but we have plenty of calories from fat and added sugars," she said…

U.S. habits suggest demand may lie behind these shortages. "Our intakes of fruit are low. Our intake of vegetables is low but especially our intake of dark green and orange vegetables and legumes," Krebs-Smith said…

The cancer institute says obesity and physical inactivity account for 25 to 30 percent of colon, breast, endometrial, kidney, and esophageal cancers…

Diet and exercise can also help people survive cancer, Ballard-Barbash said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Growers Can Boost Cancer Fighting Benefits of Broccoli and Tomatoes

(Science Daily) A University of Illinois study has demonstrated that agronomic practices can greatly increase the cancer-preventive phytochemicals in broccoli and tomatoes.

"We enriched preharvest broccoli with different bioactive components, then assessed the levels of cancer-fighting enzymes in rats that ate powders made from these crops," said Elizabeth Jeffery, a U of I professor of food science and human nutrition.

The highest levels of detoxifying enzymes were found in rats that ate selenium-treated broccoli. The amount of one of the cancer-fighting compounds in broccoli was six times higher in selenium-enriched broccoli than in standard broccoli powder, she said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Researchers find daily ginger consumption eases muscle pain

(University of Georgia) For centuries, ginger root has been used as a folk remedy for a variety of ailments such as colds and upset stomachs. But now, researchers at the University of Georgia have found that daily ginger consumption also reduces muscle pain caused by exercise…

Participants in the studies, 34 and 40 volunteers, respectively, consumed capsules containing two grams of either raw or heat-treated ginger or a placebo for 11 consecutive days. On the eighth day they performed 18 extensions of the elbow flexors with a heavy weight to induce moderate muscle injury to the arm. Arm function, inflammation, pain and a biochemical involved in pain were assessed prior to and for three days after exercise.

The studies showed that daily ginger supplementation reduced the exercise-induced pain by 25 percent, and the effect was not enhanced by heat-treating the ginger.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Recipes

Cooking Light:

Superfast Mediterranean
Incorporate fresh flavors of the Mediterranean into your weeknight lineup with these tasty, healthy recipes ready in 20 minutes or less.

Artichoke Pesto Pizza
Greek Chicken Pitas
Lemon Basil Shrimp and Pasta

See all 20 Mediterranean recipes

MyRecipes.com:

Chicken, Cashew, and Red Pepper Stir-Fry
This dish balances salty, sweet, tangy, and spicy ingredients. Spoon it alongside a quick rice pilaf.

Classic Beef Pot Roast

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Study Challenges Notion That Moderate Drinking Protects the Heart

(HealthDay News) A major French study links moderate drinking to a lower risk for cardiovascular disease, but challenges the notion that moderate drinking gets the credit.

Instead, the researchers say, people who drink moderately tend to have a higher social status, exercise more, suffer less depression and enjoy superior health overall compared to heavy drinkers and lifetime abstainers.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

WHO to tackle alcohol misuse, binge drinking

(Reuters) Health ministers on Thursday agreed to try to curb binge drinking and other growing forms of excessive alcohol use through higher taxes on alcoholic drinks and tighter marketing regulations.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Muscle Loss in Elderly Linked to Blood Vessels' Failure to Dilate

(Science Daily) Why do people become physically weaker as they age? And is there any way to slow, stop, or even reverse this process, breaking the link between increasing age and frailty?

In a paper … researchers present evidence that answers to both those questions can be found in the way the network of blood vessels that threads through muscles responds to the hormone insulin.

Normally, these tiny tubes are closed, but when a young person eats a meal and insulin is released into the bloodstream, they open wide to allow nutrients to reach muscle cells. In elderly people, however, insulin has no such "vasodilating" effect…

Such results point the way to what could be a powerful new therapy for age-related frailty and the health and quality-of-life problems that come with it.

Read more.

Community: I’m reversing the muscle loss I suffered during my days of inactivity by exercising and eating a healthier diet. Really. I had noticed how sharp my shin bones looked, the older I got. Now, they hardly stand out at all. My knees and legs are much stronger, and I can lift more weight more easily.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Viagra could double risk of hearing loss

(Reuters Health) Is an erection worth becoming hard of hearing?

A new US study suggests men who take Pfizer's Viagra (sildenafil) or similar drugs for erectile dysfunction may double their chances of hearing impairment, bolstering a Food and Drug Administration warning from 2007 about this side effect.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Less Invasive Fix for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Works

(HealthDay News) For patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm, a less invasive procedure called endovascular repair appears as good as conventional surgery, Dutch researchers report.

In previous studies, endovascular repair has been shown to have fewer complications and deaths associated with it and the recovery time is much shorter than with open surgery. However, questions remained about whether endovascular repair would result in more deaths over time, the researchers noted.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Female Incontinence Surgeries Look Equally Effective

(HealthDay News) Two common surgical procedures for female stress incontinence appear to be equally effective, a new study reveals, but each option carries its own side effects.

Known as mid-urethral slings, the techniques are often used to address stress incontinence or urine loss that results from activities such as coughing, sneezing or laughing.

Urinary incontinence affects about half of all women, noted the research team…

Both procedures achieved a cure rate for stress incontinence of between 78 and 81 percent. And with each option, the related side effects dissipated within a couple of weeks, the study found.

Read more.

Community: Having dealt with the results of several surgeries, I am determined to avoid having any more of them, if at all possible. Better to try less drastic methods first, to see if they work, such as Kegel exercises in this case.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Progress in Exploring New Avenues for Brain Repair

(Science Daily) A research team … reports a major step forward in discovering a therapy for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or stroke. The researchers were able to convert glial cells of the brain into two different functional classes of neurons…

Due to these encouraging results, the researchers intend to pursue this avenue further to gain new neurons from the glial cells present in the brain, in order to find therapies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Parallel Brainstem Circuit Discovery Suggests New Path in Parkinson's Research

(Science Daily) [R]esearchers studying the lowly lamprey eel have identified an overlooked nervous system pathway running parallel to known brainstem locomotor command circuitry in vertebrates such as birds, fishes and mammals…

Simon Alford, University of Illinois at Chicago professor of biological sciences and the article's corresponding author, said the role of a neurotransmitter associated with this parallel pathway may also suggest new research directions for treating Parkinson's disease.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Preserving Memory With Age: Two Methods of Extending Life Span Have Very Different Effects

(Science Daily) Two methods of extending life span have very different effects on memory performance and decline with age, researchers at Princeton University have shown…

They found that the molecules required for learning and memory appear to be conserved from C. elegans to mammals, suggesting that the basic mechanisms underlying learning and memory are ancient.

The authors also determined how each of the behaviors declines with age, and tested the effects of two known regulators of longevity -- dietary restriction and reduced Insulin/IGF-1 signaling -- on these declines. Surprisingly, very different effects on memory were achieved with the two longevity treatments: dietary restriction impaired memory in early adulthood but maintained memory with age, while reduced Insulin/IGF-1 signaling improved early adult memory performance but failed to preserve it with age. These results suggest not only that longevity treatments could help preserve cognitive function with age, but also that different longevity treatments might have very different effects on such declines.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Suicide Risk May Be Higher in Senior Facilities

(HealthDay News) Seniors living in assisted-living and long-term care facilities may have a higher rate of suicide than those who continue living in their own homes, suggests a new report…

One reason may be that stressful or troubling events -- such as death of a spouse, illness or a decline in physical function -- may underlie the move to a residential care facility, the researchers say.

"The risk of suicide may be heightened during the first year," said the report's lead author, Carol Podgorski… "There's relocation stress, and that's when they're dealing with whatever caused them to move."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]