A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

Daylight Savings: Not a Bright Time for All

(HealthDay News) [The shift to daylight savings time tonight] may not be such a welcome change for people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a seasonal depression that occurs in the fall and winter and is caused, at least in part, by the lack of daylight during these seasons. Some experts suspect that light in the morning may be especially important for helping people with SAD, as well as for jumpstarting circadian rhythms in all people…

"The hallmark of seasonal affective disorder is a pattern of depression that occurs in the fall and winter months that improves in the spring. There's a definite seasonal pattern," explained Dr. Emil Coccaro… "They have a major depression in the fall and winter when there's less light and they recover when there's more and more light."

The main treatment for SAD is exposure to bright lights, he said. And, during the fall and winter, people with SAD do this using light boxes that flood extra light into an area.

Read more.

Community: I’m somewhat susceptible to the change in time. I’ve put a very bright light in the room where I do my early morning work, so we’ll see if it keeps me from feeling like I’m suffering from jet lag for the next few days, as I normally do. I like having light longer later in the day, so I wish we’d just stay on daylight savings time all year round.

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CDC used frequent-shopper cards to find salmonella

(AP) As they scrambled recently to trace the source of a salmonella outbreak that sickened hundreds around the country, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used a new tool for the first time — the frequent-shopper cards that millions of Americans swipe when they buy groceries.

With permission from the victims, investigators followed the trail of grocery purchases to a Rhode Island company that makes salami, then zeroed in on the pepper it used to season the meat.

Never before has the CDC successfully mined the mountain of data that supermarket chains compile.

"It was really exciting. It was a break in the investigation for sure," CDC epidemiologist Casey Barton Behravesh said.

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Panera Bread to post calories on menus at company stores

(AP) Panera Bread customers around the country soon will be able to tally calories for their smokehouse turkey panini and broccoli cheddar soup with just a glance at the menu board.

Panera announced Wednesday that it will be the first nationwide chain to voluntarily post calorie information at all of its company-owned restaurants. The move is notable in an industry that had historically opposed requirements that chain operations post calorie counts.

But the landscape is changing as local laws mandating nutritional disclosure become more common and Congress considers a nationwide mandate. This is only one in a wave of changes consumers can expect to see on chain restaurant menus in coming years.

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5 Food Package Claims That Deserve a Double Take

(U.S. News & World Report) Last week, the Food and Drug Administration warned 17 food companies that the marketing claims on some of their products weren't in line with government rules. If you buy ice cream marketed as having "zero grams trans fat," for example, but it still contains a significant amount of saturated and total fat, that information is supposed to be prominent. The letters are part of the FDA's move to address the confusion surrounding front-of-package claims, an effort that will include a standardization of how this information is presented.

Until it's all sorted out, there are plenty of food labels that are difficult to decipher, say dietitians and nutrition experts. Here are some claims that warrant a closer look before you buy:

1. Foods claiming to "support your immune system." A food can carry this claim if it contains certain levels of nutrients—including vitamins C and A—that, when deficient in the diet, can negatively affect the immune system. But that doesn't mean that adding those nutrients to an already adequate diet will supercharge your immunity or protect you from the flu…

2. Sugary foods that advertise their virtues. Cocoa Krispies isn't alone; plenty of sugary cereals and other foods tout the presence of other nutrients. It's not that sugar is evil, but it is caloric, and you shouldn't be fooled by the "health halo" that hovers over some foods pointing out the presence of other nutrients…

3. Treats that are "made with real fruit." There may be plenty of good reasons to eat snacks making this claim, but the fruit content is rarely one of them…

4. Food "made with whole grains." In its recent report "Food Labeling Chaos," the Center for Science in the Public Interest called on the FDA to require products making this claim to "disclose what percentage of total grains are whole."…

5. Products claiming they're "natural." The CSPI's recent food labeling report wants the FDA to crack down on this claim and to prohibit the term's use in foods made with high-fructose corn syrup or artificial ingredients. Here's an easy rule of thumb: Ignore the claim entirely. "Natural" is virtually meaningless; not everything made in a lab is harmful, not everything that pops up in the natural world is beneficial (E. coli is perfectly natural, after all), and distinguishing between the two is often an exercise in splitting hairs rather than a way of determining what you really want to know: How healthful is this food?

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Small cities = more stores = more obesity

(UPI) U.S. researchers say low-income women in small cities have a higher chance of obesity.

Researchers at Kansas State University in Manhattan link higher risk of obesity in cities with fewer than 40,000 people to the availability of food stores -- rather than the lack of them.

Women who resided in these cities had an 18 percent increase in obesity risk when living within a 1-mile radius of a supermarket. The presence of small grocery and convenience stores also was associated with an increased risk of obesity.

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MyRecipes.com

Szechuan-Style Tofu with Peanuts
Spice up your supper with this Asian-flavored vegetarian dish. For meat-lovers, feel free to substitute chicken for tofu.

5 to Try: Irish Favorites

7 Ways With Apples

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Plavix Less Effective in Some Patients

(HealthDay News) The anti-clotting drug Plavix must now carry a "black box" warning on its label, alerting patients and doctors that some people don't metabolize the medication properly, U.S. health officials said Friday.

Patients with a certain genetic variation can't convert the blood thinner into its active form, which puts them at risk for heart attack and stroke, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned.

"If the patient makes less of the active form, there is less antiplatelet effect in the blood, and the patient may not receive the full benefit of Plavix treatment," Mary Ross Southworth, FDA's deputy director for safety in the division of cardiovascular and renal products at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said during an afternoon press conference.

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Long-term use of osteoporosis drugs linked to hip breaks

(USA Today) A popular group of drugs prescribed to slow bone loss may be putting some patients at an increased risk of hip fractures if taken for more than five years.

Two new studies show the bones of some post-menopausal women who take bisphosphonates (Actonel, Boniva, Fosamax, Reclast) to ward off osteoporosis can stop rejuvenating and become brittle after long-term use.

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Powerful Molecule Regulator in Blood Pressure Control System

(Science Daily) Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's School of Dentistry have discovered that nitric oxide is a powerful regulator of a molecule that plays a critical role in the development and function of the nervous system. The finding could someday play a significant role in the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure, which affects about one in three adults in the United States…

Nitric oxide is known for its ability to improve the elasticity of blood vessels and to lower blood pressure. It is the active metabolite of nitroglycerin, which has been used to treat coronary artery disease for more than 100 years. Nitric oxide widens small arteries and counteracts artery stiffening, and several lines of evidence also indicate that its deficiency leads to hypertension.

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Knee Surgeon's Expectations May Differ From Yours

(HealthDay News) Doctors and patients often have different expectations for knee and hip replacement surgery, and steps should be taken to close that gap, a new study shows…

"For the patient, the take-home message is that it is paramount to discuss the expectations for pain relief and function with the surgeon and in the class before undergoing a total joint replacement to make sure that the expectations of the physician and the patient are similar."

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MRIs May Detect Hidden Tumors in Breast Cancer Patients

(HealthDay News) MRI scans are more likely to turn up undiagnosed tumors in the breasts of postmenopausal women who already had cancer in their other breast, researchers report.

However, the scans are less likely to detect tumors in premenopausal women, they added.

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Tumors May Respond to Extreme and Moderate Heat

(Science Daily) Aided by ultrasound guidance, treating tumors with extreme heat or moderate heat may provide a possible therapeutic option, according to early research…

"Low temperature controlled hyperthermia and high temperature treatments are beneficial in curing both malignant and benign tumors using minimally invasive and noninvasive ultrasound techniques," said Osama M. Al-Bataineh, Ph.D.

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Brain Tumor's 'Grow-or-Go' Switch Discovered

(Science Daily) Cancer cells in rapidly growing brain tumors must adjust to periods of low energy or die. When energy levels are high, tumor cells grow and proliferate. When levels are low, the cells grow less and migrate more.

Researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute have discovered the switch responsible for this grow-or-go behavior…

This behavior was closely linked to the cancer's ability to invade and spread. For this reason the molecule might serve as a biomarker to predict how long patients with the brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme will survive and may serve as a target to develop drugs to fight these tumors.

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Study: Too many heart patients get angiograms

(AP) A troublingly high number of U.S. patients who are given angiograms to check for heart disease turn out not to have a significant problem, according to the latest study to suggest Americans get an excess of medical tests.

The researchers said the findings suggest doctors must do better in determining which patients should be subjected to the cost and risks of an angiogram. The test carries a small but real risk — less than 1% — of causing a stroke or heart attack, and also entails radiation exposure.

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Insurers test health plans that stress patient choices

(Kaiser Health News) Workers at a Portland, Ore., steel mill soon will be able to pick a new type of insurance that offers free care for some illnesses, such as diabetes or depression, but requires hefty extra fees for treatments deemed overused, including knee replacements, hysterectomies and heart bypass surgery.

The insurance, which will be offered by five different insurers in Oregon, is the most far-reaching and potentially controversial step in an effort by employers nationally to rein in medical spending by redesigning health benefits.

"We're trying to make people better consumers," says John Worcester, head of benefits at Evraz Oregon Steel, the sole employer to sign up since the plans began coming on the market earlier this year.

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Massage Eases Anxiety, but No Better Than Simple Relaxation Does

(Science Daily) A new randomized trial shows that on average, three months after receiving a series of 10 massage sessions, patients had half the symptoms of anxiety. This improvement resembles that previously reported with psychotherapy, medications, or both. But the trial … also found massage to be no more effective than simple relaxation in a room alone with soft, soothing music.

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U.S. Chalks Up Victories in War on Cancer

(HealthDay News) The decrease in cancer deaths in the United States since 1990 is the result of reduced tobacco use, increased cancer screening and improvements in treatment, according to an American Cancer Society study.

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Medicine's Future Could Lie in Each Patient's Genome

(HealthDay News) Two separate scientific teams announced this week that they had successfully sequenced individual genomes to pinpoint precise genetic causes of illness -- breakthroughs that open the door to a future of individualized, genomics-based medicine.

"This is another milestone in the inevitable march towards personalized genetic health," said Dr. Robert Marion… "Medicine is going to change from waiting for symptoms to develop to knowing what this person is at risk for and being able to stop that from happening. Eventually, we're talking about prevention."

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Body's Response to Foods' Smell, Taste Could Be Diabetes Risk Factor

(HealthDay News) -- A mutation that affects how the body responds when a person smells or tastes food may play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes in some people, U.S. researchers report.

"Our study showed there is a novel genetic mutation through which some type 2 diabetic people could be vulnerable to the gradual onset of this disease," study senior author Vann Bennett.

Read more.

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Facts on Food Claims

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Before purchasing a product, be sure to read all the ingredients, regardless of what the label says. All healthy food products should use whole ingredients and not list any processed flours, additives, or added sugars such as high fructose corn syrup… [T]o help you make the best food choices, here are the facts on some of the most common food claims…

“Enriched” means the nutrients that were originally in the food were lost during the refining process and have been replaced to make it more nutritious. Enriched foods don’t compensate for the natural nutrients and fiber that were lost during processing…

Foods that are “fortified” have nutrients added to the food that were never present in the original product. Fortified foods still have their natural ingredients, and in most cases have added health benefits, such as vitamins…

Beware of foods labeled “all-natural” or “100% natural.” The FDA and USDA don’t regulate products with these claims. The labels “all-natural” and “100% natural” suggest that the food is nutritious and wholesome, but they may contain hydrogenated oils and chemical preservatives, all of which are not natural ingredients…

All food products that have the “USDA Organic” seal must contain at least 95 percent organic ingredients. Products that have the “made with organic ingredients” label consist of at least 70 percent organic ingredients.

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MyRecipes.com

Herbed Stuffed Chicken Breasts
Dish up a company-worthy dish that calls for only four ingredients, plus salt and pepper. Choose roasted asparagus as a bright, fresh partner for this main dish.

13 Quick & Easy Salmon Dinners

Pot Roast 101

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Calcium may help you live longer: study

(Reuters Health) Getting a bit more calcium in your diet could help you live longer, new research suggests.

Swedish researchers found that men who consumed the most calcium in food were 25 percent less likely to die over the next decade than their peers who took in the least calcium from food. None of the men took calcium supplements.

The findings are in line with previous research linking higher calcium intake with lower mortality in both men and women, the researchers point out.

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Garlic may be strong cancer fighter

(UPI) A new test hints garlic may be a strong cancer fighter, Ohio State University researchers say…

The small pilot study, reported in Analytical Biochemistry, found the results of the urine test suggested the more garlic people consumed, the lower the levels of [a] potential carcinogenic process were.

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Seaweed May Help Treat Lymphoma

(HealthDay News) Seaweed extract has the potential to become a treatment for the immune system cancer known as lymphoma, according to the results of preliminary research…

[Researchers] tested human lymphoma cells with a type of seaweed extract that is sold commercially. They found that it inhibited growth of cancerous cells but did not affect healthy cells.

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Obesity, Drinking a Double Threat to the Liver

(HealthDay News) Obesity plus daily drinking boosts the risk of liver disease in men and women, researchers report in two new studies.

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Variable Blood Pressure a New Stroke Risk Factor?

(HealthDay News) Challenging established medical wisdom about blood pressure and stroke, new British research suggests that extremely variable blood pressure, and not just high blood pressure, can greatly increase a person's risk of stroke.

"Some people have very stable hypertension, in which case simple hypertension is all that matters, but variability and episodic hypertension is very common and matters much more than mean blood pressure in some patients," said Dr. Peter Rothwell.

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Novel Stroke Treatment Passes Safety Stage of Clinical Trial

(Science Daily) A clinical research trial of a new treatment to restore brain cells damaged by stroke has passed an important safety stage, according to the UC Irvine neurologist who led the effort.

Dr. Steven C. Cramer said patients showed no ill effects after the sequential administration of growth factors encouraging the creation of neurons in stroke-damaged areas of the brain.

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Scientists Find Stem Cells in Hair That Can Become Skin

(HealthDay News) Scientists have found a type of stem cell tucked away in hair follicles that is capable of morphing into all three types of skin cells.

"They are saying they have found the earliest stem cell, in the hair follicles, which actually leads to making epidermis, sebaceous tissue and hair follicles," explained Paul Sanberg… "These cells in adult hair follicles are, in fact, helping to make new skin."

"If we understand the biology better, we might be able to develop new treatments for skin and perhaps even hair replacement," Sanberg added.

Read more.

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New Knee May Improve Balance

(HealthDay News) A knee replacement can help improve an elderly person's balance, according to a new study…

"Balance is critical to the elderly, especially those with knee problems," Dr. Leonid Kandel, … lead author of the study, said… "This study reinforced our hypothesis about how an osteoarthritic patient's function is compromised, not only due to pain but also by balance."

Read more.

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Contraceptive Pill Not Associated With Increased Long-Term Risk of Death, Study Finds

(Science Daily) Women in the UK who have ever used the oral contraceptive pill are less likely to die from any cause, including all cancers and heart disease, compared with never users, according to research…

The results show a slightly higher risk in women under 45 years old who are current or recent users of the pill. The authors stress that the effects in younger women disappear after about 10 years.

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Mind Reading Moves Closer to Reality

(HealthDay News) Mind reading may have taken a step away from the realm of science fiction, thanks to a new study in which researchers taught a computer to spot specific memories as a person was having them.

To be sure, science is a long way off from hooking people up to a device and knowing their thoughts. But the study showed that past events leave unique "memory traces" in a portion of the brain called the hippocampus, traces that can be distinguished from one another in brain scans.

Read more.

Community: Can mind “conditioning” be far behind? There’s way too much of that going on already.

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After a Fight With a Partner, Brain Activity Predicts Emotional Resiliency

(Science Daily) Common wisdom tells us that for a successful relationship partners shouldn't go to bed angry. But new research from a psychologist at Harvard University suggests that brain activity -- specifically in the region called the lateral prefrontal cortex -- is a far better indicator of how someone will feel in the days following a fight with his or her partner.

Individuals who show more neural activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex are less likely to be upset the day after fighting with partners, according to a study… The findings point to the lateral prefrontal cortex's role in emotion regulation, and suggest that improved function within this region may also improve day-to-day mood.

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Drugmakers agree on landmark vaccines deal for poor

(Reuters) Several drug firms have agreed on a landmark deal to supply up to 200 million doses a year of cut-price pneumococcal vaccines to developing nations, according to the global immunization alliance that is overseeing the deal.

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Does Family History Put Me at Higher Risk of Heart Attack?

(Dr. Arthur Agatston, Everyday Health) Yes. Family history is an often underestimated and under-reported risk factor for heart disease and heart attack…

The more distant a relative is and the older that person is when he or she had a heart attack, the less concerned you need to be. The more closely related you are to family members who have had heart attacks and the younger they were when the event occurred, the greater your risk is…

Furthermore, if one of your siblings has heart disease or has had a heart attack, that puts you at an even higher risk than if one of your parents has heart-related issues, because the sibling, besides having similar genes, has usually grown up in an environment similar to yours. Experts suggest that if you have a brother or sister with cardiovascular disease, your own risk is increased by as much as 100 percent…

[But] having a family history of heart disease is not a guarantee of a heart attack. And even if you're diagnosed with heart disease, improving your diet, getting regular exercise, and taking medications as necessary can go a long way toward reducing plaque buildup and improving your risk profile. The earlier that high-risk individuals are evaluated, the easier it is to prevent a heart attack.

Read more.

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Alternative to Statins Shows Promise

(HealthDay News) -- A thyroid-derived cholesterol-lowering drug that could be an alternative to the widely used statin medications has done well in a small, early trial, Swedish and American researchers report…

[T]hough statins are widely used and most often successful, an alternative to them would be welcome, [Dr. Paul W.] Ladenson said. Statins are not effective in up to a quarter of potential users because of unacceptable muscle pain or simple failure to lower cholesterol levels, he said.

Read more.

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Frequent Napping Linked to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Older Adults

(Science Daily) A [new] study … shows that frequent napping is associated with an elevated prevalence of type 2 diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in an older Chinese population…

The authors noted that the association between napping and diabetes was observed despite the fact that nappers had higher levels of physical activity, which has been shown to reduce the risk of diabetes. This suggests that the relationship between napping and diabetes might have been stronger had it not been offset by the protective effects of physical activity. The authors added that there will be profound public health implications in China if the relationship between napping and increased risk of type 2 diabetes is confirmed in longitudinal studies, as the nation is currently affected by an emerging diabetes epidemic.

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Discovery of 'Fat' Taste Could Hold the Key to Reducing Obesity

(Science Daily) A newly discovered ability for people to taste fat could hold the key to reducing obesity, Deakin University health researchers believe…

[They] have found that humans can detect a sixth taste -- fat. They also found that people with a high sensitivity to the taste of fat tended to eat less fatty foods and were less likely to be overweight…

"We are now interested in understanding why some people are sensitive and others are not, which we believe will lead to ways of helping people lower their fat intakes and aide development of new low fat foods and diets."

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Americans want U.S. help on food shopping

(UPI) Eighty-six percent of U.S. adults favor government implementation of front-of-pack labeling of calories, nutrients and fiber, a survey indicates.

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Recipes

Cooking Light:

St. Patrick's Day Feast
Rich
stew, chewy brown soda bread, smoked salmon with horseradish, and more: everything you need for a delightful St. Patrick's Day get-together.

5-Ingredient Pantry Recipes
Streamline your meals with these simple recipes. You might have everything you need on hand.

Simple Shrimp Glaze
Chicken with Cider and Bacon Sauce
Sautéed Tilapia with Lemon-Peppercorn Pan Sauce

Meat Loaf Makeover
We made over this classic family favorite, slashing calories and fat while keeping it juicy and delicious.

MyRecipes.com:

Fiery Beef and Rice Noodle Salad
Think salads aren't filling? Then you haven't tried this one (packed with fresh vegetables and tender steak).

Fix-and-Freeze Recipes

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Gastric Bypass Surgery Increases Risk of Kidney Stones, Study Suggests

(Science Daily) Patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery experience changes in their urine composition that increase their risk of developing kidney stones, research from UT Southwestern Medical Center investigators suggests.

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Smoking years key factor in lower Parkinson's risk

(Reuters Health) Several studies have shown that smokers have a lower risk of developing Parkinson's disease. A new study shows that it's how many years of smoking a person has under their belt -- rather than how much they smoke every day -- that matters.

Read more.

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Hormone Thought to Slow Aging Associated With Increased Risk of Cancer Death

(Science Daily) According to a new study…, older men with high levels of the hormone IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor 1) are at increased risk of cancer death, independent of age, lifestyle and cancer history.

IGF-I is a protein hormone similar in structure to insulin and is regulated in the body by growth hormone (GH). Levels of GH and IGF-I decline progressively with age in both men and women and this drop is thought to be related to deteriorating health conditions found with advanced age. In an attempt to combat aging some people use GH as its actions elevate IGF-1.This study however showed that older men who had higher levels of IGF-I were more likely to die from a cancer-related cause in the following 18 years than men with lower levels…

"Although the design of this study does not explicitly show that the higher IGF-I levels caused the cancer death, it does encourage more study as well as a reexamination of the use of IGF-I enhancing therapies as an anti-aging strategy."

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Papaya Extract Thwarts Growth of Cancer Cells in Lab Tests

(Science Daily) University of Florida researcher Nam Dang, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues in Japan have documented papaya's dramatic anticancer effect against a broad range of lab-grown tumors, including cancers of the cervix, breast, liver, lung and pancreas. The researchers used an extract made from dried papaya leaves, and the anticancer effects were stronger when cells received larger doses of the tea…

Dang and his colleagues also documented for the first time that papaya leaf extract boosts the production of key signaling molecules called Th1-type cytokines. This regulation of the immune system, in addition to papaya's direct antitumor effect on various cancers, suggests possible therapeutic strategies that use the immune system to fight cancers.

The papaya extract did not have any toxic effects on normal cells, avoiding a common and devastating consequence of many cancer therapy regimens. The success of the papaya extract in acting on cancer without toxicity is consistent with reports from indigenous populations in Australia and his native Vietnam, said Dang.

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Scientists Find Key to Hormone-Resistant Prostate Tumors

(HealthDay News) Though hormone therapy has proven useful in treating late-stage prostate cancer, it often results in the development of fatal secondary tumors that are resistant to such therapy.

Now, however, researchers working with mice believe they have uncovered a mechanism by which the secondary tumors gain their resistance -- a finding that eventually might help prolong the lives of men with prostate cancer.

Read more.

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Alcoholics' Relapses Better Understood

(HealthDay News) [R]esearchers gave lab rats free access to alcohol or sugar for nearly two months, followed by a few weeks of abstinence. The rats who had consumed alcohol, but not those that had consumed sugar, showed increased electrical activity in a part of the brain called the nucleus accumbens (NAcb) core, which plays a role in motivation and goal-directed behaviors.

This increased activity in the NAcb core after abstinence resulted from the inhibition of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK)…

The results indicate that decreased SK currents and increased activity in the NAcb core play a critical role in alcoholics' relapse after quitting drinking, said the researchers…

"Our findings are particularly exciting because the FDA-approved drug chlorzoxazone, which has been used for more than 30 years as a muscle relaxant, can activate SK channels," senior author Dr. Antonello Bonci said… "[I]t provides an unexpected and very exciting opportunity to design human clinical trials to examine whether chlorzoxazone, or other SK activators, reduce excessive or pathological alcohol drinking."

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Vaccination, Prevention Is Beating Back Hepatitis

(HealthDay News) Decades of vaccination and prevention efforts may have the hepatitis viruses on the run, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Read more.

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Potential for Using Algae to Produce Human Therapeutic Proteins Shown

(Science Daily) Pharmaceutical companies could substantially reduce the expense of costly treatments for cancer and other diseases produced from mammalian or bacterial cells by growing these human therapeutic proteins in algae -- rapidly growing aquatic plant cells that have recently gained attention for their ability to produce biofuels…

The scientists reported in their paper that all of the algal-produced proteins in their study showed biological activity comparable to the same proteins produced by traditional commercial techniques. And because algae cells can be grown cheaply and quickly, doubling in number every 12 hours, they noted that algae could be superior to current biological systems for the production of many human therapeutic proteins.

Read more.

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Entire Family Genome Sequenced for First Time

(HealthDay News) -- Children inherit fewer gene mutations from their parents than was previously thought, say U.S. researchers who are the first to sequence the entire genome of a family.

The analysis of the four family members -- the parents, daughter and son -- revealed that each parent passes about 30 mutations to their children. It had long been believed that each parent passes 75 gene mutations to their children…

"The mutation rate is our clock, and every time it ticks we have a new genetic variant. We need to know how fast the clock ticks," [Lynn B.] Jorde said.

The actual rate of gene mutations each parent gives a child will vary depending on the age of the parents (particularly the father) when a child is conceived.

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Physicians Click Their Way to Better Prescriptions

(Science Daily) Is it time for all community-based doctors to turn to e-prescribing to cut down on the number of medication errors? According to [researchers], electronic prescriptions can dramatically reduce prescribing errors -- up to seven-fold…

The authors conclude: "Prescribing errors may occur much more frequently in community-based practices than previously reported. Our study is one of the first to demonstrate a reduction in prescribing errors in ambulatory solo and small group community practices, where e-prescribing adoption and usage has lagged. Our findings suggest that stand-alone e-prescribing with clinical decision support may significantly improve ambulatory medication safety."

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INSPIRATION

Spreading happiness makes me happy.

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Cooperation, kindness is contagious

(UPI) Cooperative behavior is contagious and spreads from person to person to person -- just like negative behavior, U.S. researchers found…

When people benefit from kindness they "pay it forward" by helping others who were not originally involved and this creates a cascade of cooperation that influences dozens more in a social network, the researchers said.

Read more.

Community: Negativity has infected our nation, especially the internet. We can use a lot more positivity.

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As You Age, Better Health Means Better Sex

(HealthDay News) Better health translates into better sex lives, with healthy people more likely to engage in sex (and good sex at that) and to express an interest in sex, new research finds.

This association held firm into middle-age and later life as well, according to the study by University of Chicago researchers…

Overall, however, more men reported a satisfying sex life than women, a chasm that widened as people aged…

"Why should men be having better sex than women? Viagra came out for men. Where's the female equivalent? For whatever reason women are not as satisfied as men and that needs to be addressed," [Dr. Eva Ritvo asked].

Read more.

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Researcher Presents Risk-Free Treatment for Low Female Sexual Desire

(Science Daily) According to [studies], people who engage in regular sexual activity gain several health benefits, such as longer lives, healthier hearts, lower blood pressure, and lower risk of breast cancer. However, approximately 33 percent of women may not receive these benefits due to low sexual desire. Also, the marriages of women with low sexual desire may also be at risk, given a recent statistic that 25 percent of divorce is due to sexual dissatisfaction…

[Associate professor Laurie] Mintz has authored a book [A Tired Woman's Guide to Passionate Sex: Reclaim Your Desire and Reignite Your Relationship] based on this premise. In her book, Mintz suggests a six-step psycho-educational and cognitive-behavioral treatment approach that she based on scientific literature and more than 20 years of clinical knowledge. The treatment plan includes chapters about one's thoughts about sex, how to talk with your partner, the importance of spending time together, ways to touch each other in both erotic and non-erotic ways, how to make time for sex and different ways to make sexual activity exciting and thus, increase women's sexual desire…

On average, women who read the book increased their level of sexual desire by almost 30 percent.

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