A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

INSPIRATION

If I learn from a failure, then I haven’t failed.

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Review Highlights Health Benefits of Flexible Working Arrangements

(Science Daily) There is evidence to suggest that flexible working might be beneficial for employees' health if they are allowed to have input into their own working patterns, a review by Cochrane Researchers suggests. The study may throw some light on potential health benefits associated with current trends towards more flexible working in the UK and Europe…

Self-scheduling of working hours was found to have positive impacts on a number of health outcomes including blood pressure, sleep and mental health.

Read more.

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Deadly Driving Habits: Study on the Effect of Routine in Driving

(Science Daily) In a new study, the Cologne physicist Professor Dr. André Bresges has examined why drivers make fatal errors on familiar routes…

The findings of the study show that the brain is more active and reacts more along unfamiliar routes. When the test persons became familiar with the routes, the activity of their brains became less; this was the case for both the experienced and inexperienced drivers. This means that drivers drive on familiar routes without consciously orientating themselves.

The Police in North Rhine-Westphalia are currently examining whether the data form the study can be applied to road safety measurements while the findings have already been implemented into police training courses for road safety advice.

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Exercise Helps Protect Brain of Multiple Sclerosis Patients, Study Suggests

(Science Daily) Highly fit multiple sclerosis patients perform significantly better on tests of cognitive function than similar less-fit patients, a new study shows.

In addition, MRI scans of the patients showed that the fitter MS patients showed less damage in parts of the brain that show deterioration as a result of MS, as well as a greater volume of vital gray matter.

"We found that aerobic fitness has a protective effect on parts of the brain that are most affected by multiple sclerosis," said Ruchika Shaurya Prakash, lead author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University.

"As a result, these fitter patients actually show better performance on tasks that measure processing speed."

Read more.

Community: Exercise is good for everyone.

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When Seniors Tutor Kids, They Sharpen Their Own Minds As Well

(HealthDay News) A recent study found that among seniors, tutoring might help delay or even reverse some of the signs of aging in the brain.

After six months of tutoring, functional MRIs of the brains of eight Experience Corps volunteers showed improvements in regions of the brain involved in thinking and the ability to organize multiple tasks. Called "executive function," it's a skill that's crucial to maintaining independence in old age, said study author Michelle Carlso.

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Untreated Poor Vision in Elderly Linked to Dementia Study Shows

(Science Daily) Elderly people with visual disorders that are left untreated are significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease -- the most common form of dementia, according to a University of Michigan Health System study.

The study used Medicare data and shows that those with poor vision who visited an ophthalmologist at least once for an examination were 64 percent less likely to develop dementia.

The study … may draw a new picture of poor vision as predictor of dementia rather than as a symptom after the diagnosis.

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Green Tea May Ward Off Eye Disease

(HealthDay News) Substances found in green tea work their way into the tissues of the eye and could protect against common eye diseases like glaucoma, researchers say.

The findings … suggest that the substances, known as catechins, are absorbed by the lens, retina and other parts of the eye. Catechins are antioxidants thought to protect the body against damage from oxygen.

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Vitamin D cuts risk of heart disease

(UPI) British researchers say a review of studies shows vitamin D could reduce heart disease and diabetes.

Researchers at Warwick Medical School in Coventry, England, found middle-aged and elderly people with high levels of vitamin D reduced their chances of developing cardiometabolic disorders such as heart disease or diabetes by 43 percent.

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Community: Vitamin D has many other benefits, as well, and most Americans don’t get enough.

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MyRecipes.com

Scallop Piccata with Sautéed Spinach

Serve on a bed of angel hair pasta, linguine, or brown rice, if desired.

5 to Try: Casseroles

A Month of Heart-Healthy Recipes

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Protein Appears Key to Intestinal Balance

(HealthDay News) A protein that plays a key role in protecting the intestinal tract from bacterial infection and inflammation has been identified by U.S. researchers.

Reduced levels of the protein -- granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) -- could be an underlying factor in severe illness caused by pathogens such as E. coli and intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease, the researchers said…

A greater understanding of the role of GM-CSF in the gut could lead to new treatments based on the protein.

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Tiny Molecular 'Trash' May Tell Big Story About Cardiovascular Disease Risk

(Science Daily) Tiny bits of molecular "trash" found in circulating blood appear to be good predictors of cardiovascular disease and untimely death, say researchers at Duke University Medical Center…

[Researchers] compared metabolic profiles between those who suffered a heart attack or death with those who did not. Using multiple analytic and statistical methods, they found two factors that were clearly associated with coronary artery disease and one factor that predicted greater risk of heart attack or death among patients with coronary artery disease.

"When we added these biomarkers to traditional clinical risk models, we found that they increased the accuracy of projected risk," says [Svati Shah, M.D., M.H.S.].

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FDA reports says Avandia can hurt heart: report

(Reuters) Confidential U.S. government reports recommend that GlaxoSmithKline Plc's diabetes drug Avandia be pulled from the market because it can hurt the heart, The New York Times reported on Friday.

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Dips in Breast Cancer Rates Seen Most in Affluent Women

(HealthDay News) Breast cancer rates are declining, especially among women over 50 who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors, and now a new study narrows down the reason why.

After analyzing data on more than 350,000 women with breast cancer, Harvard researchers concluded that the decline may be linked with decreasing use of hormone replacement therapy -- and that association, in turn, may explain why the decline is especially evident among white, affluent women.

Those are the very women most likely to have used hormone replacement therapy, experts said, and to have stopped using it following the July 2002 release of the results of the Women's Health Initiative, a large national study that discovered an increased risk of breast cancer and heart disease with hormone replacement therapy.

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Complementary medicine for breast cancer

(UPI) U.S. researchers are producing a DVD and booklet on the safety and effectiveness of alternative and complementary medicine for women with breast cancer.

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Gold nanoparticles may zap cancer cells

(UPI) Sending gold nanoparticles into cancer cells can kill them, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta suggest.

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Chickens May Provide Clues to Color Vision

(HealthDay News) Chickens and other birds have a better ability to see color than humans, a new study finds.

U.S. scientists mapped five types of light receptors in the chicken's eye and found that the receptors are arranged in interwoven patterns that maximize the bird's ability to see many colors in any part of the retina, the light-sensing structure at the back of the eye…

Learning more about how color receptors are organized could help lead to new treatments for the nearly 200 genetic disorders that cause various forms of blindness in humans.

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Helmets should be a new fashion statement

(UPI) The world's elite athletes at the Olympic Winter Games compete with helmets, but too many forgo this safety equipment, a Toronto neurosurgeon says…

Research shows that about 120,000 people in North America suffer head injuries while skiing or snowboarding each year, while recent studies have shown that helmets help reduce the risk of head injuries by up to 60 percent.

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Studies Show Marijuana Has 'Therapeutic Value'; Research Reported to California Legislature

(Science Daily) Researchers from the University of California's Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) have found "reasonable evidence that cannabis is a promising treatment" for some specific, pain-related medical conditions…

These studies showed that cannabis can be helpful in easing pain in selected syndromes caused by injury or diseases of the nervous system and possibly for painful muscle spasms due to multiple sclerosis.

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Cellphone stories steer to better eating

(UPI) Georgia Institute of Technology researchers are testing if cellphones can help steer people away from chocolate cake and toward fruits and vegetables…

EatWell uses cellphones to record and share audio stories with community members about how they've overcome temptation or tried something healthier.

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Another Reason To Eat Oats

(Science Daily) Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-funded scientists have reported new reasons for choosing "heart-healthy" oats at the grocery store.

Nutritionist Mohsen Meydani … led the research on the oat compounds, called avenanthramides. Meydani previously has shown that phenolic antioxidants in oats obstruct the ability of blood cells to stick to artery walls.

Chronic inflammation inside the arterial wall is part of the process that eventually leads to a disorder known as atherosclerosis. Meydani and colleagues have reported findings that suggest the avenanthramides of oats decrease the expression of inflammatory molecules. The study showed that forms of avenanthramides possess potential anti-inflammatory properties through inhibiting factors that are linked with activating proinflammatory cytokines.

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Your Complete Guide to Poultry

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Lean protein [not only curbs] hunger, … it also helps to maintain muscle and keep blood-sugar levels balanced as you’re losing weight. And when it comes to choosing lean meat, white-meat poultry is an excellent choice because it is low in saturated fat, while still providing you with vital amino acids.

In addition, poultry is rich in vitamin B6, which is essential for regulating your metabolism and for helping to reduce the risk of heart disease. Vitamin B6 also plays a role in helping your body process carbohydrates and break down glycogen, a form of sugar that is stored in the body. Poultry is also a good source of niacin, which can help raise “good” HDL cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels.

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MyRecipes.com

Grilled Turkey and Ham Sandwiches

Enjoy with carrot sticks and tomato soup.

7 Ways With a Slow Cooker

10 Chili Recipes Under 300 Calories

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Fortify Your GI Tract with This Midnight Munchie

(RealAge.com) An 18-year study suggests that eating a couple of servings of [popcorn] each week could do nice things for your colon, like reduce the risk of diverticulitis by 28 percent…

For years, doctors have warned patients with diverticulitis to avoid popcorn, thinking that the undigestible bits could cause serious complications. This new study has many wondering if that thinking could be a little off track. But don't make any changes to your diet without talking to your doctor first. For people who do not have diverticular disease, a couple of servings of popcorn a week could be just the ticket to avoiding the painful condition down the road. Nuts also seemed to lower diverticulitis risk in the study.

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3 Things to Know Before You Buy Vitamins

(RealAge.com) A vitamin supplement can be a great way to fill in nutrition gaps. But before you spend your money, there are three questions to answer.

How much should you spend? What's the best form to take? And when should you take it? The answers are not much, small doses, and whenever, according to Elizabeth Somer, RD, author of Eat Your Way to Happiness.

Vitamins on the cheap: Somer says you can get just as much bang for your vitamin buck with cheaper pills. A good strategy for reducing cost: Avoid vitamin ingredients that tend to add cost without any real additional benefits -- like lipoic acid, enzymes, and primrose oil. And don't forget that you can lower your unit price per pill by buying in bulk. (Learn which cheap foods can make you healthier.)

Time-released and chelated: Time-released supplements actually dissolve so slowly that they're usually not totally absorbed, according to Somer. A better strategy? Split up your multivitamin into smaller doses throughout the day. There's also no proof that chelated or colloidal minerals are absorbed any better than regular mineral supplements. (Find out what the YOU Docs recommend for supplements.)

When to pop your pill: Morning, afternoon, or evening -- it doesn't really matter, Somer says. But to absorb as much of your vitamins or supplements as possible, take them with food, and spread them out throughout the day. Also keep in mind that calcium supplements and multivitamins with iron compete for absorption and should be taken separately. (Here's more advice on how and when to take calcium.)

Don't overdo it! Find out why too much vitamin A can be dangerous.

Source

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New Weight Loss Aid?

(HealthDay News) An amino acid called isoleucine may play an important role in weight loss, a new study suggests…

[M]ice who received … isoleucine gained less weight than those in the control group from day 17 to the end of the 28-day treatment period. The mice in the isoleucine group also had lower serum insulin concentrations, but there were no differences in levels of glucose, triglycerides or fatty acids.

The researchers also found that isoleucine improved the glucose-lowering effects of insulin, reduced fat deposits and increased fat metabolism.

The findings suggest that isoleucine may prove useful in the treatment of obesity, concluded the researchers, who called for clinical trials to test this hypothesis.

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FDA Issues Warning on Key Asthma Drugs

(HealthDay News) A new label warning will caution users of four widely used asthma drugs to avoid using these medicines as a sole or long-term means of symptom control, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Thursday.

The medicines are GlaxoSmithKline's Advair and Serevent, Novartis's Foradil and AstraZeneca's Symbicort. All are in the class of drugs known as long-acting beta agonists (LABAs). Serevent and Foradil are single-agent LABAs while Advair and Symbicort also contain an inhaled corticosteroid.

LABAs should no longer be used alone in treating adults and children, the FDA said. In making its decision, the agency cited studies that found that using the drugs alone can actually increase the severity of asthma, leading to hospitalizations and even death.

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Kidneys From Older Donors Suitable for Seniors

(HealthDay News) Too many American seniors who need a new kidney have to wait longer than necessary for a transplant, researchers say.

In a new study, Johns Hopkins researchers analyzed kidney donation data from 2003-2008 and found that one-third of patients over age 65 experience unnecessary delays because their doctors don't put them on a list for kidneys from older donors (extended-criteria donors, or ECDs) that are unsuitable for younger patients but perfectly fine for older patients.

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Community: I’ve wondered about this possibility. And also that older potential recipients might not care if the potential donor has had a disease or a treatment that would make his or her organs unacceptable for younger recipients. They won’t take my blood because of previous radiation treatments, for example, but if I died in an accident and my heart was found to be in good shape, it might help someone who’s low on the recipient priority list.

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Scientists Spot Genetic 'Fingerprints' of Individual Cancers

(HealthDay News) Researchers have found a way to analyze the "fingerprint" of a cancer, and then use that fingerprint to track the trajectory of that particular tumor in that particular person.

"[This technique] will allow us to measure the amount of cancer in any clinical specimen as soon as the cancer is identified by biopsy," said study co-author Dr. Luis Diaz… "This can then be scanned for gene rearrangements, which will then be used as a template to track that particular cancer."

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Community: Someday, treatments themselves will be specific to the particular cancer.

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Critical Step in Fly Vision Discovered; Offers Clues to Treating Retinal Degeneration in Humans

(Science Daily) Research by Johns Hopkins sensory biologists studying fruit flies has revealed a critical step in fly vision. Humans with problems in this same step suffer retinal dystrophies, which manifest as visual defects ranging from mild visual impairments to complete blindness. The [study] paves the way for using the fruit fly to screen for therapies to treat human retinal degeneration.

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FDA staff say agency may need new device powers

(Reuters) U.S. Food and Drug Administration staff said they face difficulties in reviewing certain medical devices, hurdles that may call for additional regulations and authorities, even as the industry defended the current approval process.

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New Technology Could Widen Reach of Vaccines

(HealthDay News) Researchers report that they've developed an inexpensive way to keep vaccines stable without the use of refrigerators or freezers, even in the high temperatures of the tropics…

The ability to ship vaccines at normal temperatures … would cut costs and make the vaccines more accessible.

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Happiness Protects Your Heart

(HealthDay News) People who are enthusiastic and content are less likely to develop heart disease than less happy people, researchers from Columbia University report.

In this prospective study of the relationship between happiness and heart disease, researchers concluded that if everyone did more of the things that made them happy, they could significantly reduce their risk of heart attack and angina…

[Lead researcher Karina] Davidson speculated that several factors may combine to producing this effect. Happier people tend to sleep better and to practice more heart-healthy behaviors, she said.

"But they may also be physiologically different than those of us who are more unhappy," Davidson said.

Read more.

Community: I do believe that some people are more predisposed to being happy than others. A positive attitude certainly doesn’t come naturally to me. But, fortunately, the brain is malleable enough that we can learn to behave in ways that maximize our happiness quotient.

Conversely, think about how the news and political media, particularly talk radio, conspire to keep us afraid and angry. They’re actually killing us.

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Building Fit Minds Under Stress

(Science Daily) A University of Pennsylvania-led study in which training was provided to a high-stress U.S. military group preparing for deployment to Iraq has demonstrated a positive link between mindfulness training, or MT, and improvements in mood and working memory. Mindfulness is the ability to be aware and attentive of the present moment without emotional reactivity or volatility.

The study found that the more time participants spent engaging in daily mindfulness exercises the better their mood and working memory, the cognitive term for complex thought, problem solving and cognitive control of emotions. The study also suggests that sufficient MT practice may protect against functional impairments associated with high-stress challenges that require a tremendous amount of cognitive control, self-awareness, situational awareness and emotional regulation.

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Hands-free alternative to texting created

(UPI) U.S. researchers say they have developed a hands-free alternative to cellphone texting while driving…

[The] team developed an application called VoiceTEXT that allows drivers to speak text messages and keep their eyes on the road.

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Rising Use of Medical Technologies Extending Americans' Lives

(HealthDay News) Surging use of improved medical technology, including new drugs, is driving up life expectancy for Americans and driving down rates of major killers such as heart disease and cancer, a new national health report finds.

At the same time, some things about the nation's health that experts hoped were changing actually did not, the report found, and the use and misuse of medical technology may also be a factor behind the ever-increasing cost of health care…

"Trends for death rates are favorable, while disability trends are neutral, and trends for the total population burden of obesity and chronic disease are decidedly adverse," [Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale School of Public Health,] said. "The more societal resources we allocate to medical technology, the less we may devote to supporting the lifestyle practices that can actually build health at its origins."

In an age of evidence-based medicine and unsustainable health-care costs, Katz said, advanced medical technology cannot be "toys with which we play just because we have them."

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Small Liquid Sensor May Detect Cancer Instantly, Could Lead to Home Detection Kit

(Science Daily) What if it were possible to go to the store and buy a kit to quickly and accurately diagnose cancer, similar to a pregnancy test? A University of Missouri researcher is developing a tiny sensor, known as an acoustic resonant sensor, that is smaller than a human hair and could test bodily fluids for a variety of diseases, including breast and prostate cancers…

"Our ultimate goal is to produce a device that will simply and quickly diagnose multiple specific diseases, and eventually be used to create 'point of care' systems, which are services provided to patients at their bedsides," [Prof. Jae] Kwon said. "The sensor has strong commercial potential to be manifested as simple home kits for easy, rapid and accurate diagnosis of various diseases, such as breast cancer and prostate cancer."

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Botulinum Toxin Injection May Help Prevent Some Types of Migraine Pain

(Science Daily) A preliminary study suggests the same type of botulinum injection used for cosmetic purposes may be associated with reduced frequency of migraine headaches that are described as crushing, vicelike or eye-popping (ocular), but not pain that is experienced as a buildup of pressure inside the head, according to a report.

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Scorpion venom may be new morphine

(UPI) Scorpion venom could be an alternative to morphine, researchers at Tel Aviv University suggest.

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Community: The new growth business: scorpion farms!

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Ibuprofen May Help Stave Off Parkinson's

(HealthDay News) Regular use of ibuprofen, a common anti-inflammatory drug, significantly lowers the risk for developing Parkinson's disease, Harvard researchers report.

People who took three or more tablets a week showed a 40 percent lower risk than those who didn't take the common pain reliever, their study found…

No other pain reliever was found to lower the risk for Parkinson's…

[Dr. Michele] Tagliati called the study "eye-opening." Parkinson's is not considered an inflammatory disease, [s]he said, adding: "We might be missing something. There is more work to be done."

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Bilberry Seems to Act Against Blood Sugar

(HealthDay News) Bilberry extract helps control blood sugar levels in mice, researchers have found.

Bilberry and other brightly colored foods such as blueberries, purple grapes, cherries and cranberries contain anthocyanins, which are thought to reduce blood sugar, improve insulin sensitivity and reduce obesity in laboratory mice.

Read more.

Community: And there are other ways to improve insulin sensitivity, including eating foods high in soluble fiber, doing strength-building exercises, and including apple cider vinegar in the diet.

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Trans Fat Confusion?

(Dr. Arthur Agatston, Everyday Health) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires food manufacturers to display the amount of trans fats on all of their product labels. You'll see this number listed on the Nutritional Facts panel after Total Fat and Saturated Fat. Dietary supplements (such as energy and nutritional bars) will also list trans fats on their Supplement Facts panel if the product contains 0.5 grams or more of trans fat.

Trans fats are created when manufacturers turn liquid oils into solid fats through a process called hydrogenation, which was originally done to increase the shelf life of foods. But we now know that consuming trans fats contributes to clogged arteries -- which can lead to heart disease or stroke.

Besides listing the amounts of trans fats, these labels will also tell you the amounts of saturated fats and cholesterol so you can compare products and choose the ones with the lowest amounts. Why should you be concerned about these numbers? Consuming trans fats raises your LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels, which in turn increases your risk for heart disease, stroke, obesity, and other conditions. These fats also lower your HDL, the good, protective form of lipids. Foods high in saturated fats and cholesterol can also increase your risk for heart disease, but since trans fats have a negative effect on both HDL and LDL, they probably pose an even greater risk than saturated fats.

Try to minimize your intake of trans fats as much as possible, and instead focus on eating products containing the "good" fats, such as extra-virgin olive and canola oils.

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MyRecipes.com

Eat Like a President

Shrimp Po'boy with Spicy Ketchup
A New Orleans specialty, this sandwich is often made with deep-fried shrimp. Oven-frying the shrimp, which are coated in garlicky breadcrumbs, delivers big flavor without the fat.

Fast and Easy New Orleans-Style Dishes

Dinner Tonight: Chicken Cacciatore

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5-Ingredient Chicken Recipes

(Cooking Light ) Fresh ingredients paired with pantry staples create a fresh take on chicken for speedy, weeknight meals.

Grilled Chicken with Rustic Mustard Cream
Chicken-Tortilla Pie
Balsamic Chicken with Roasted Tomatoes
Barbecue-Stuffed Potatoes

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An Easy One-Pot Meal

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Beef and Bean Chili : Looking to add more time to your busy weeknight schedule? Try minimizing your time in the kitchen by preparing one-pot meals. This delicious chili recipe is not only cooked in one pot, meaning less time cleaning and more time relaxing, but it’s brimming with lean protein and fiber.

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Pan-Frying Meat With Gas May Be Worse Than Electricity for Raising Cancer Risk

(Science Daily) Frying meat on a gas burner may be more harmful to health than using an electric burner, because of the type of fumes it produces, suggests research.

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Rosemary may cut cancer-causing agents

(UPI) The addition of rosemary extract to ground beef reduces cancer-causing agents that can form upon cooking, U.S. researchers said.

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New seasonal flu vaccine to contain H1N1 strain

(Reuters) The coming year's seasonal flu vaccine in the northern hemisphere should include protection against three strains of flu, including the pandemic H1N1 virus, the World Health Organization recommended on Thursday.

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Chronic Migraine Sufferers Sicker, Poorer and More Depressed Than Episodic Migraine Sufferers

(Science Daily) Chronic migraine sufferers tend to be in poorer general health, less well off, and more depressed than those with episodic migraine, reveals research.

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Obesity -- Mild or Severe -- Raises Kidney Stone Risk

(Science Daily) Obesity in general nearly doubles the risk of developing kidney stones, but the degree of obesity doesn't appear to increase or decrease the risk one way or the other, a new study from Johns Hopkins shows.

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Low-Dose Platelet Transfusions Deemed Safe

(HealthDay News) A lower dose of platelets than is commonly used is safe for people who require transfusions of the clot-forming blood cells, a new study shows.

That's good news for people getting chemotherapy or bone marrow transplants because platelets are often in short supply, said Dr. Victor M. Aquino.

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Stem cell experiment reverses aging in rare disease

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In a surprise result that can help in the understanding of both aging and cancer, researchers working with an engineered type of stem cell said they reversed the aging process in a rare genetic disease…

Simply turning the skin cells into iPS cells helped restore their damaged telomeres, [the] team reported. This in theory stops a major component of the aging process as well.

"We're not saying we've found the fountain of youth, but the process of creating iPS cells recapitulates some of the biology that our species uses to rejuvenate itself in each generation," … Suneet Agarwal said in a statement.

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Most Americans Think It's Others Who Are Unhealthy

(HealthDay News) Despite rising rates of obesity and diabetes, a new survey has found that a majority of Americans believe their health is just fine - it's everyone else who has the problem.

More than 50 percent of respondents said that other people's health "was going in the wrong direction." In contrast, only 17 percent said their own health was going in the wrong direction…

"Either people are denying reality about themselves or they don't have the correct knowledge and believe they are doing the right things," said study author Dr. Michael Roizen… "Personally, I think there is a lot of misinformation [about healthy habits]."

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U.S. counties ranked for health

(UPI) Location may be as significant to health outcomes as it is to real estate, a ranking of health by county indicates, U.S. researchers say.

The County Health Rankings -- by the University of Wisconsin's Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation -- the first set of reports to rank the overall health of every county in all 50 states -- is at: www.countyhealthrankings.org.

Each county is ranked within a state on how healthy people are and how long they live. Rankings also take into account key factors that affect health, such as smoking, obesity, binge drinking, access to primary care providers, rates of high school graduation, rates of violent crime, air pollution levels, liquor store density, unemployment rates and number of children living in poverty.

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Making the same mistakes in love can stop

(UPI) A U.S. psychologist says a pattern of unhealthy relationships or making the same mistakes in love over and over can be broken…

One way to iron out the wrinkles for the capacity for love is simply to be more present, or mindful, in everyday life, [Dr. Mark] Beitel says.

"Mindfulness can also help us to see our loved ones as they are rather than as we want them to be," Beitel says. "Seeing others clearly reduces the confusion, biases and inappropriate expectations that prevent us from connecting authentically."

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Volunteering Can Bring Rewards Even in the Workplace

(HealthDay News) Volunteer work offers mental health benefits and may even help you perform better in your paying job, the results of a German study show…

There was a positive relationship between the amount of time spent volunteering and the participants' need satisfaction, psychological detachment from work and their learning experiences, the researchers found. In addition, improvements in active listening at work the following day were noted among those who reported more need satisfaction and psychological detachment from work.

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Soccer Practice May Significantly Reduce Blood Pressure in Inactive People

(Science Daily) A just published research experiment on inactive men with high blood pressure shows that just 3 months of soccer practise twice a week causes a significant fall in blood pressure, resting pulse rate, and percentage of body fat, and is more effective than the doctor's usual advice on healthy diet and exercise.

Other parallel experiments on both women and men further demonstrates that a regular game of soccer affects numerous cardiovascular risk factors such as maximal oxygen uptake, heart function, elasticity of the vascular system, blood pressure, cholesterol and fat mass far more than e.g. strength training and just as much if not more than running.

Read more.

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Hormone therapy increases heart risk

(UPI) Analyses from the Women's Health Initiative confirm combination hormone therapy increases heart disease risk, U.S. researchers said…

The study … found a trend toward an increased risk of heart disease during the first two years of hormone therapy among women who began therapy within 10 years of menopause, and a more marked elevation of risk among women who began hormone therapy more than 10 years after menopause.

Read more.

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Women Need More Help After Heart Attack

(HealthDay News) Women are in greater need of social support in the critical year after a heart attack than men, new research shows.

The study of 2,411 people treated for heart attacks at 19 U.S. medical centers found that both men and women who received the least support from health personnel, families and friends did worse on a variety of measures, according to the report…

"We were looking at a number of outcomes that are important for individuals, rather than just whether they die or remain hospitalized," said Judith Lichtman…, a leader of the study. "We saw that lack of social support inhibits quality of life."

Men and women with the lowest level of social support had a higher risk of chest pain, worse mental functioning and more symptoms of depression. But the association between social support and general health was stronger for women than for men, she added.

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Small Increase in Diabetes Risk Noted in Statin Patients

(HealthDay News) The use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs increases the chance of developing diabetes by 9 percent, but the absolute risk is low, especially when compared with how much statins reduce the threat of heart disease and heart attack, new research shows…

To put their findings in context, the study authors pointed out that if 255 patients took statins for four years, there would be only one extra case of diabetes. However, for each millimole per liter reduction in LDL cholesterol achieved by taking statins, the same 255 patients would experience five fewer major coronary events, such as coronary heart disease death or non-fatal heart attack.

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Aspirin May Boost Breast Cancer Survival

(HealthDay News) A new study of more than 4,000 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer shows that taking aspirin appears to significantly increase survival and reduce the risk of recurrence.

"Women who took aspirin were 50 percent less likely to die from breast cancer [during the study follow-up period] than those who did not take it," said study author Dr. Michelle Holmes…

Exactly how aspirin confers a risk reduction is not known, Holmes said. But the new research is in line with some previous studies. "We're appreciating more and more that cancer is an inflammatory disease, and aspirin is an anti-inflammatory," she said.

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Could aspirin cause hearing loss?

(Harvard Healthbeat) Q. I am 85 and have taken an 81-mg aspirin each day for decades for heart attack prevention. Recently, I noticed these words on the label: “Stop using if you get ringing in your ears or loss of hearing.” Should I be worried?

A. In a word, no.

In the body, aspirin gets converted into a chemical called salicylic acid, so the side effect that the label is referring to is sometimes called salicylism, or more simply, aspirin poisoning. Very high levels of aspirin in the blood can have toxic effects. Tinnitus — a ringing or whistling noise in the ear — and hearing loss are among them. But there’s no risk of that happening at an 81-mg dose.

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Researchers Find Biomarkers in Saliva for Detection of Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer

(Science Daily) Physicians and scientists agree: If we cannot entirely prevent cancer, the next best thing is to find it earlier to augment the chances of a successful fight.

The good news is that there may soon be a new weapon in the battle against the so-called "worst" cancer -- cancer of the pancreas. A multidisciplinary group of investigators … has demonstrated the usefulness of salivary diagnostics in the effort to find and fight the disease.

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