A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

Weight Loss Secrets From Around the World

(Reader’s Digest) We've collected ingenious tips from 18 countries, asking leading nutritionists and Reader's Digest's international editors to divulge the quirks of their cultures that can help us all stay lean.

Hot peppers raise your metabolism, but the real benefit of food with a little zing is that it slows your eating, says James Hill, PhD…

The Brits prefer smaller portions

Brazilians stay slim by enjoying [rice and beans] with just about every meal, says [the] editor of Reader's Digest Brazil. A study in the journal Obesity Research found that a diet consisting primarily of rice and beans lowers the risk of becoming overweight by about 14 percent when compared with typical Western fare…

Islam … encourages periodic fasting—no food or drink from dawn to dusk… Although experts don't recommend fasting for weight control, fasting in moderation can break patterns of mindless eating, says [a representative] of the American Society for Nutrition…

Eat at home more often than you eat out… "People who don't cook at home tend to eat less healthy food and be heavier than people who do," says journalist and activist Michael Pollan. "In fact, the collapse of cooking in a society tracks very closely its rise in obesity."

Eat your breakfast… In [a recent study], British researchers discovered that if you haven't eaten breakfast, your brain's reward center will light up more vividly when you see a high-calorie food—making you more likely to indulge…

Swap the gas pedal for the bike pedal… Bike-to-Work Day in the United States is Friday, May 21—try using your bike to commute that day or just for errands close to home…

Muesli is a porridge or cereal made from oats, fruit, and nuts, each of which has been linked to better health and weight control… Muesli's fiber makes it slow to digest, keeping you feeling full longer. Read the label carefully, though: Sugar content can vary from 2 to 14 grams per serving… [Community: Or you can make your own.]

Russians grow their own vegetables and fruits and preserve and can what they grow. That makes their diet more nutritious…

Turn up the turmeric… One of its chief components is a substance called curcumin, which may turn out to be a potent fat fighter. A recent Tufts University study found that mice fed a high-fat diet with small amounts of curcumin gained less weight than did other mice given similar but curcumin-free meals…

[R]ooibos tea is more robust than green tea, and because it's naturally sweet, it needs no sugar. Ditching your daily Frappuccino for a cup of rooibos—Starbucks now sells it—could save you thousands of calories per month…

Hungarians like things pickled—not just cucumbers but bell peppers, cabbage, and tomatoes. These tart treats can help keep you thin, probably because of the vinegar that pickles them… [Community: But watch for salt content.]

Start a Nordic tradition in your house. At halftime, shoo everyone outdoors for a walk around the neighborhood

Yoga is best done on an empty stomach and can build muscle (depending on your preferred poses), which boosts your metabolism. And it encourages mindfulness, which includes paying attention to whether you feel full.

Perfect the power nap… In [Japan], many people take time for a daily 20- to 30-minute nap, says James Maas, PhD, a sleep researcher at Cornell University and the author of Power Sleep. There's increasing evidence that chronic sleep deprivation raises the risk of weight gain…

Make the midday meal the biggest … [i]nstead of ingesting the bulk of the day's calories in the evening, as most Americans do…

Sit long, talk lots [at meals]… Conversation slows down the fork and gives you time to realize you're full.

Take up nordic walking… All that's required is a pair of inexpensive, lightweight walking poles. Holding these in your hands aids balance, which is great if you're older or if you're on slippery terrain. Even better: Because they make you use muscles in your shoulders, arms, and torso, the poles transform walking into a total-body workout that burns 20 percent more calories, according to a study… [Community: I also get more of a workout in my daily walk by flexing other muscles.]

Oily fish like herring is slimming for a few reasons, says Dr. Pescatore, author of The Hamptons Diet. It contains lots of omega-3 fatty acids, which reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol—and cortisol is known to increase the amount of fat deposited around your middle.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Family fat explains some of family diabetes risk

(Reuters Health) Having type 2 diabetes in the family more than doubles a woman's own risk of developing the disease, new research shows.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Diabetes may be linked to pollutants

(UPI) There is growing evidence diabetes -- especially among indigenous people -- may be linked to environmental pollutants, U.S. and Canadian researchers say.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Secondhand smoke a danger to smokers

(UPI) People who have a health risk from smoking have an additional risk from breathing environmental tobacco smoke -- secondhand smoke -- researchers in Italy found.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Losing Sleep, Losing Brain?

(Science Daily) Chronic and severely stressful situations, like those connected to depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, have been associated with smaller volumes in "stress sensitive" brain regions, such as … a brain region involved in memory formation. A new study … suggests that chronic insomnia may be another condition associated with reduced cortical volume.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Diet changes improve older adults' cholesterol too

(Reuters Health) Older adults can cut their cholesterol levels by revamping their dietary fat intake -- even if they are already on cholesterol-lowering statins, a new study finds.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Your Complete Guide to Beef

(SouthBeachDiet.com) Lean protein curbs hunger and allows you to maintain muscle mass while losing weight, which keeps your metabolism running at its peak efficiency. Lean beef is not only a good source of protein but also of iron and vitamin B12. Lean cuts of beef — those containing less saturated fat, such as sirloin and tenderloin — are recommended… Other fattier cuts, like prime rib, should be … eaten sparingly…

To choose the leanest beef, you should consider both its grade and cut. ..

You can also use your eyes to gauge what’s leanest, avoiding those with lots of white marbling…

There are also measures you can take in the kitchen to further decrease the fat in beef. For starters, trim any visible fat before cooking. Certain cooking methods can also significantly reduce the fat, such as:

  • broiling
  • boiling
  • baking
  • roasting
  • grilling

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

11 Delicious Beef Slow Cooker Recipes

(MyRecipes.com) Let the slow-cooker do the work for you in these decadent beef recipes.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Quick Chicken Noodle Soup

(MyRecipes.com) Heat the broth mixture in the microwave to jump-start the cooking. Meanwhile, sauté the aromatic ingredients in your soup pot to get this dish under way. Though we like the shape of fusilli, you can also make this soup with wide egg noodles, rotini, or even orzo.

Read more.

Community: Or rice. I’ve always liked chicken with rice soup better than chicken noodle soup. I don’t like the taste or texture of brown rice, but we do buy the parboiled. It’s not quite as refined, and therefore contains more nutrients, than polished rice.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Are You Getting Enough Whole Grains?

(MyRecipes.com) According to the MyPyramid healthy eating guide from the U.S.D.A., for a 2,000-calorie diet, you need about six servings of grain products each day, and at least half those should be whole grains.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Making Old Stem Cells Act Young Again

(Science Daily) [The] age-related decline in stem cell potency may be somewhat reversible. A team of … researchers has found that in old mice, a several-week exposure to the blood of young mice causes their bone marrow stem cells to act "young" again.

The researchers have not yet isolated the blood-borne factors that can switch old stem cells back to a more youthful state, but their results are consistent with other recent studies that show stem-cell aging may be reversible. Together those results suggest that it might one day be possible to boost the practical lifespan of stem cells, and thereby increase the body's resistance to disease and age-related degeneration.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Targeting Cancer Stem Cells May Eradicate Tumors

(HealthDay News) New ways of identifying and studying cancer stem cells in the lab could accelerate understanding of the cells and lead to the development of drugs that target them, British researchers say.

"Cancer stem cells drive the growth of a tumor. If we could target treatments against these cells specifically, we should be able to eradicate the cancer completely," Dr. Trevor Yeung [said].

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Parkinson's More Common in Northeast, Midwest

(HealthDay News) The largest study of its kind finds that Parkinson's disease in the United States is more common in the Midwest and Northeast, and that whites and Hispanics are twice as likely to develop the disease as blacks and Asians…

[Study lead author Dr. Allison Wright Willis said,] "These are the two regions of the country most involved in metal processing and agriculture, and chemicals used in these fields are the strongest potential environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease that we've identified so far."…

"It could be that those with Asian or African ancestry have genes that help protect them from exposure to environmental factors that cause Parkinson's disease, or they may have fewer exposures to those factors."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Insurers Must Offer Equal Coverage for Those With Emotional, Addiction Problems

(HealthDay News) Group health insurance plans can no longer limit benefits and require higher patient costs for people with mental health or substance abuse disorders, according to new rules issued Friday by the U.S. government.

Any group health plan -- typically offered by employers -- that includes mental health and substance abuse disorder benefits must treat them equally with standard medical and surgical coverage in terms of out-of-pocket costs, benefit limits and practices such as prior authorization and utilization review, according to the new rules.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Couples who use more 'we,' 'us' happier

(UPI) Married couples who use the pronouns "we," "our" and "us" more often than "I," "me" and "you," may have happier marriages, U.S. researchers suggest.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

5 Habits That Stop Strokes

(RealAge.com) Walk every day, maintain a healthy weight, avoid cigarette smoke, enjoy alcohol only in moderation, and eat as nutritiously as you can. Some of these you probably already do. But tack on the missing items and your stroke risk drops dramatically…

In a large study of men and women in their fifties, those who most adhered to these five basic health habits were 80 percent less likely to have an ischemic stroke -- the most common type of stroke. Specifically, these study participants exercised about 30 minutes a day and had BMIs below 25, and their diet mainstays were fruit, veggies, whole grains, and lean protein. Also, the women had no more than one alcoholic drink a day; the men, no more than two.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Quick and Simple Ways to Work Out at Work

(SouthBeachDiet.com) [S]ome exercise is always better than none. If you can’t find time for fitness before or after work, here are seven tips to help you squeeze fitness into your workday.

  1. Park farther away from the office, or get off public transportation at an earlier stop.
  2. Take the stairs instead of the elevator, especially if you have just a few flights to climb.
  3. Go for a walk during lunch…
  4. Walk over to coworkers’ desks when you need to chat with them or deliver messages rather than using e-mail or the phone.
  5. Instead of meeting friends in the office or over lunch, meet to take a walk instead.
  6. Use your headset or cell phone and walk around while talking on the phone.
  7. Stretch occasionally while sitting at your desk or leave a light pair of weights at work and do some upper-body exercises.

Read more.

Community: When I take public transportation, I walk up and down while waiting for the train or bus.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

What You Eat After Exercise Matters

(Science Daily) Many of the health benefits of aerobic exercise are due to the most recent exercise session (rather than weeks, months and even years of exercise training), and the nature of these benefits can be greatly affected by the food we eat afterwards, according to a study…

[It] found that exercise enhanced insulin sensitivity, particularly when meals eaten after the exercise session contained relatively low carbohydrate content…

Interestingly, when the research subjects in this study ate relatively low-calorie meals after exercise, this did not improve insulin sensitivity any more than when they ate enough calories to match what they expended during exercise. This suggests that you don't have to starve yourself after exercise to still reap some of the important health benefits.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

3 Ways to Stop Overeating -- for Good

(RealAge.com) Use these strategies to nix bad habits and eat right:

· Get lost (in your mind). When you want to eat to feel better, walk around the block…

· Plan… Avoid filling your home with junk and it’ll be easier to eat right. Shop the edges of the supermarket rather than the middle.

· Pay it forward. One of the keys to waist-size success is how you balance two competing forces -- immediate gratification (those chips) versus delayed gratification (a better body, better sex, fewer wrinkles, not to mention a longer life!)… So try flipping the immediate gratification into a long-term consequence and turning the delayed gratification into an immediate, visual picture. Like this: Think hard about the negative consequences of the chips (picture a clogged artery). Now, visualize yourself two sizes smaller with all the grandchildren you want (or just Brad Pitt or Megan Fox lying next to you).

Read more.

Community: Remember the finding that smokers are more likely to quit when reminded of the benefits of not smoking, rather than warned about the dangers of smoking. The same psychology may work for overeating. Also, remember that a higher glucose level in the bood helps us make better long-term decisions. One of the sayings in 12-Step programs is to never get Hungry, Angry, Lonely, or Tired (HALT). All of those conditions impair our judgment. Of course, it’s not possible to avoid the conditions entirely, but it helps me to remind myself about the impairment when I’m suffering from one of them.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings May Reduce Depression Symptoms

(Science Daily) One of many reasons that attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings helps people with alcohol use disorders stay sober appears to be alleviation of depression. A team of researchers has found that study participants who attended AA meetings more frequently had fewer symptoms of depression -- along with less drinking -- than did those with less AA participation.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Degree of Obesity Raises Risk of Stroke, Regardless of Gender, Race

(Science Daily) The higher a person's degree of obesity, the higher their risk of stroke -- regardless of race, gender and how obesity is measured, according to a new study.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

The New Smart Diet for Healthy Eyes

(RealAge.com) A low-glycemic-index diet has long been touted as a way to avoid blood sugar problems. And now it seems this approach to eating may help keep your eyes in good standing, too.

In a study, people who took a low-glycemic-index approach to their meals had a lower risk of both early and advanced age-related macular degeneration -- a common sight stealer among older adults…

To follow a low-glycemic-index diet, you need your meals to be centered around foods that have a modest effect on your blood sugar. High-fiber foods are one example. They are digested slowly and therefore have a smaller impact on blood sugar than highly refined carbs. Get the complete lowdown on low-glycemic-index eating here

In addition to eating a low-glycemic-index diet, you can further protect your vision by including certain sight-saving nutrients in your meals. People who ate a low-glycemic-index diet and also got plenty of zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamins E and C, and omega-3 fatty acids had the lowest risk of age-related macular degeneration.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Too Little Vitamin D May Worsen Asthma

(HealthDay News) People with asthma who have low levels of vitamin D fare worse than those with high levels of the "sunshine" vitamin, a new study finds.

Researchers found that asthmatics with high vitamin D levels have better lung function and respond better to treatment than asthmatics with low vitamin D levels do.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

A Mind at Rest Strengthens Memories, Researchers Find

ScienceDaily (Jan. 29, 2010) — Our memories are strengthened during periods of rest while we are awake, researchers at New York University have found. The findings, which appear in the latest issue of the journal Neuron, expand our understanding of how memories are boosted -- previous studies had shown this process occurs during sleep, but not during times of awake rest.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Virtual Colonoscopy a Good Bet for Elderly

(HealthDay News) Virtual colonoscopy is a safe and effective way to screen older patients for colorectal cancer, a new study indicates.

Researchers looked at the use of computed tomographic colonography (CTC) in 577 patients aged 65 to 79 and found it an effective way to screen for colorectal cancer in elderly patients. It produces low referral-for-colonoscopy rates that are similar to other screening tests covered by Medicare, and doesn't result in unreasonable levels of additional testing because of extracolonic findings, they noted.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Symptoms Alone Don't Spot Ovarian Cancer Early

(HealthDay News) Relying on symptoms alone to identify women who have ovarian cancer isn't very effective at catching the disease early, a new study indicates.

Research shows that women with ovarian cancer are much more likely than healthy women to report symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, feeling full quickly after eating and urinary urgency, especially if the symptoms are relatively new and persistent, said study author Mary Anne Rossing…

In the absence of more precise screening techniques, [Cara Tenenbuam of the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance] said women and their doctors should be aware of possible signs of ovarian cancer, and women should not hesitate to see their doctors if their symptoms are persistent or are clearly not how they usually feel.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Herceptin Again Proves Mettle Against Breast Cancer

(HealthDay News) High-risk breast cancer patients with HER2-positive tumors benefit from receiving the targeted therapy Herceptin while undergoing chemotherapy, new research shows…

Previous research has shown that Herceptin with chemotherapy helped women with both early and metastatic breast cancer live longer.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Change in Mammography Guidelines Questioned

(Science Daily) The methodology and evidence behind a widely publicized change in national mammography guidelines is questionable, according to a review in the Journal of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (JDMS).

In November 2009, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published a report in the Annals of Internal Medicine discussing the screening techniques for the early detection of breast cancer. A few isolated portions of that report, regarding recommended changes for the use of mammography, were widely discussed in the media, and garnered tremendous public attention.

This new JDMS article provides an evidenced-based review of the work and recommendations contained in the USPSTF report and raises the question whether the controversial conclusions for breast cancer screening were supported by established scientific measurement and research standards.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Technique for Preserving Pre-Transplant Livers Improves Outcomes and Organ Pool

(Science Daily) Preserving organs on ice prior to transplantation, an approach known as cold storage or CS, has been the standard practice in liver transplant for 20 years. Now there is new evidence that a technique called hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) may offer an improvement, according to the first-ever study comparing the impact of the two techniques on transplant outcomes…

Unlike cold storage, … HMP dynamically simulates "aliveness" by providing a continuous flow of oxygen and key nutrients to the liver while diluting and removing toxins and waste products.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Breakthrough Heart Scanner Will Allow Earlier Diagnosis

(Science Daily) An innovative cardiac scanner will dramatically improve the process of diagnosing heart conditions…

Due to its unprecedented sensitivity to magnetic fluctuations the device will be able to detect a number of conditions, including heart problems in foetuses, earlier than currently available diagnostic techniques such as ultrasound, ECG (electrocardiogram) and existing cardiac magnetometers. It will also be smaller, simpler to operate, able to gather more information and significantly cheaper than other devices currently available.

Another key benefit is that, for the first time, skilled nurses as well as doctors will be able to carry out heart scans, helping to relieve pressure on hospital waiting lists. The device will also function through clothes, cutting the time needed to perform scans and removing the need for patients to undress for an examination. It could also be taken out to a patient's home, leading to a reduction in the use of hospital facilities.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Stem Cell Breakthrough: Bone Marrow Cells Are the Answer

(Science Daily) Using cells from mice, scientists from Iowa and Iran have discovered a new strategy for making embryonic stem cell transplants less likely to be rejected by a recipient's immune system. This strategy … involves fusing bone marrow cells to embryonic stem cells.

Once fused, the hybrid cells have DNA from both the donor and recipient, raising hopes that immune rejection of embryonic stem cell therapies can be avoided without drugs.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Higher copays raise health costs in U.S. aged: study

(Reuters) Older people who have higher co-payments for doctor visits are more likely to end up in the hospital, making their treatment more costly in the long run, according to the first large U.S. study of the issue.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Smooth and Integrated Movement Patterns Can Help Individuals With Back Pain

(Science Daily) Many people with back pain do not know what is causing it and they do not receive effective treatment, but learning to move in a more integrated way makes a big difference, reveals research…

"People with long-term back pain often protect themselves by unconsciously limiting their movements," says physiotherapist Christina Schön-Ohlsson. "Such inefficient movement patterns gradually become habituated even though the original injury or strain is no longer present."

The answer to the problem is sensory motor learning, where patients are guided to find out how they are moving and how they can free themselves from self-imposed limitations. This process leads patients to develop their bodily awareness and to trust in their bodily sensations again.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Fast Food Survival Guide

(Cooking Light) Lunch on the go? Navigating the drive-thru (or food court) doesn't have to be a nutrition disaster. Find our dietitian-approved choices at several popular fast food chains.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Human Growth Hormone: Not a Life Extender After All?

(Science Daily) People profoundly deficient in human growth hormone (HGH) due to a genetic mutation appear to live just as long as people who make normal amounts of the hormone, a new study shows. The findings suggest that HGH may not be the "fountain of youth" that some researchers have suggested.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Magnesium Supplement Helps Boost Brainpower

(Science Daily) New research finds that an increase in brain magnesium improves learning and memory in young and old rats. The study … suggests that increasing magnesium intake may be a valid strategy to enhance cognitive abilities and supports speculation that inadequate levels of magnesium impair cognitive function, leading to faster deterioration of memory in aging humans…

Because it is difficult to boost brain magnesium levels with traditional oral supplements, [Professor Guosong] Liu and colleagues developed a new magnesium compound, magnesium-L-threonate (MgT) that could significantly increase magnesium in the brain via dietary supplementation.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Vitamin D Supplements Could Fight Crohn's Disease

(Science Daily) A new study has found that Vitamin D, readily available in supplements or cod liver oil, can counter the effects of Crohn's disease…

"This discovery is exciting, since it shows how an over-the-counter supplement such as Vitamin D could help people defend themselves against Crohn's disease," says Marc J. Servant, a … study collaborator. "We have identified a new treatment avenue for people with Crohn's disease or other inflammatory bowel diseases."

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Plant flavanoid may help prevent leukemia

(Reuters) Eating foods like celery and parsley which contain the naturally occurring flavanoid apigenin may help prevent leukemia, Dutch scientists said Thursday.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Green Tea May Help Treat Uterine Fibroids

(HealthDay News) Green tea extract shows promise as a treatment for uterine fibroids, say U.S. researchers who add they'll soon begin human trials of the therapy.

Uterine fibroids, which affect 40 percent of women of reproductive age, cause excessive vaginal bleeding, anemia, fatigue and lack of energy. Currently, hysterectomy is the only treatment option.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

New Scan May Help Find Aggressive Prostate Tumors

(HealthDay News) A new imaging technology promises to achieve the long-sought goal of singling out prostate cancers that are life-threatening and require the most aggressive treatment, researchers report.

Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides information about the metabolic chemistry of suspected cancerous tissue, gave good results in a small trial in which its readings were compared with those of current measures of prostate cancer danger, according to a report.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Antibiotics Might Team Up to Fight Deadly Staph Infections

(Science Daily) Researchers … have found that two antibiotics working together might be more effective in fighting pathogenic bacteria than either drug on its own.

Individually, lankacidin and lankamycin, two antibiotics produced naturally by the microbe streptomyces, are marginally effective in warding off pathogens, says Alexander Mankin, … lead investigator of the portion of the study conducted at UIC.

Mankin's team found that when used together, the two antibiotics are much more successful in inhibiting growth of dangerous pathogens such as MRSA, or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and possibly others.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Too Much Alcohol Impairs Seniors' Thinking

(HealthDay News) Elderly people who are heavy drinkers are more likely to suffer memory and cognitive problems than mild-to-moderate drinkers, a new study shows.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Warning: Your Cell Phone May Be Hazardous to Your Health

(GQ) Though the scientific debate is heated and far from resolved, there are multiple reports, mostly out of Europe's premier research institutions, of cell-phone and PDA use being linked to "brain aging," brain damage, early-onset Alz heimer's, senility, DNA damage, and even sperm die-offs (many men, after all, keep their cell phones in their pants pockets or attached at the hip). In September 2007, the European Union's environmental watchdog, the European Environment Agency, warned that cell-phone technology "could lead to a health crisis similar to those caused by asbestos, smoking, and lead in petrol."

Perhaps most worrisome, though, are the preliminary results of the multinational Interphone study… Interphone researchers reported in 2008 that after a decade of cell-phone use, the chance of getting a brain tumor—specifically on the side of the head where you use the phone—goes up as much as 40 percent for adults. Interphone researchers in Israel have found that cell phones can cause tumors of the parotid gland (the salivary gland in the cheek), and an independent study in Sweden last year concluded that people who started using a cell phone before the age of 20 were five times as likely to develop a brain tumor. Another Interphone study reported a nearly 300 percent increased risk of acoustic neuroma, a tumor of the acoustic nerve.

Read more.

Community: Sounds like it might be a good idea to use an earpiece, if you have to use a cell phone. I hate them, myself.

Thanks to Susie at Suburban Guerrilla.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

U.S. Bans Texting by Truck and Bus Drivers

(HealthDay News) Truck and bus drivers who travel interstate roadways are now banned from using a handheld device to send text messages, U.S. officials said Tuesday.

The ban, which is supported by the trucking and bus industry, goes into effect immediately, with violators subject to up to $2,750 fines, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Anti-aging cream repairs skin, sales to benefit monks

(UPI)The over-the-counter anti-aging cream Easeamine increases the production of collagen and elastin in the lower skin layers, U.S. researchers say…

"Scientists and dermatologists have long sought topical treatments that stimulate collagen production in the skin," [Dr. James G.] Dobson says in a statement. "But until the use of Adenosine in Easeamine, the products available were limited to invasive treatments or chemical solutions."

Dobson, a lay member of the Teresian Carmelite in Worcester, Mass., encouraged the community of monks to obtain the exclusive license for his patented technology.

Easeamine is sold exclusively online with nearly all profits targeted to the monks' charitable endeavors, and in particular, programs focused on helping the poor and disadvantaged through education.

A tube of Easeamine sells for $65.00 and lasts approximately three to five weeks.

Read more.

Community: Here’s the link to the website.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Gimmick-Free Weight-Loss Pill in the Works

(Science Daily) A Université de Montréal research team is developing a pill composed of leptin, the protein that tells our brain to stop eating…

Leptin regulates appetite in mammals and its levels decrease when fasting and rise during meals. It has been proven to be an appetite suppressant when administered intravenously to pathologically obese people…

The new pill is being created based on a startling Université de Montréal discovery from 2006: leptin isn't only secreted by fatty tissues. "From the first bite of any meal, leptin levels skyrocket in the bloodstream. Yet this has nothing to do with the leptin stored in the fatty tissues," says Bendayan. "In the lab, we proved that up to 80 percent of cells in our stomach also produce leptin. Those are the ones that regulate appetite."

The Université de Montréal finding led to a different understanding of how the protein works, since leptin alone can't survive in an acidic stomach without assistance. Indeed, leptin protects itself with an accomplice that acts as its bodyguard and accompanies the protein through the digestive system until it can be absorbed into the bloodstream.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Spice Up Your Everyday Meals

(SouthBeachDiet.com) [R]einvent your everyday favorites and give them a flavorful kick by experimenting with different — even exotic — herbs and spices. Varying the flavors in your favorite dishes is a great strategy for fighting food boredom, and it helps you to successfully follow your healthy eating plan. Here are a few ways to breathe new life into your meals with zesty herbs and spices from three popular cuisines.

Go Italian: Herbs like oregano, parsley, basil, rosemary, and thyme are all key ingredients in Italian food, as are spices like garlic and allspice…

Go Mexican: For a south-of-the-border flavor fiesta, make use of hot peppers, cilantro, and garlic…

Go Asian or Indian: Spices like coriander, cardamom, cumin, lemongrass, ginger, and red-pepper flakes will give your foods that Far East flair.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

7 Ways With Linguine

(MyRecipes.com) These flat pasta ribbons or "little tongues" take to just about any sauce, but they're great in casseroles, frittatas, and Asian dishes too.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Stress Hormone Key to Alcohol Dependence Discovered

(Science Daily) A team of scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found that a specific stress hormone, the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), is key to the development and maintenance of alcohol dependence in animal models. Chemically blocking the stress factor also blocked the signs and symptoms of addiction, suggesting a potentially promising area for future drug development.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Rejuvenating the Old Immune System

(Science Daily) Thanks to the progress in health care and improved living conditions, we live longer. The price we pay: Our immune system loses functionality as we age and the susceptibility to infections increases. [Researchers] are investigating this aspect of aging using a mouse model that mimics the susceptibility to infection observed in elderly humans.

The … researchers have succeeded to enhance the resistance to an infection in aged mice by treating them with a macrophage-specific growth factor. This treatment increases the amount of macrophages in aged mice and improves their capacity to fight the infection.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Avoid extremes in diabetes treatment, study finds

(Reuters) Moderation appears to be the best approach to controlling blood sugar in a form of diabetes that affects many adults, researchers said Wednesday, since lowering it too far can be as risky as letting it stay too high.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

To Restore Vision, Implant Preps and Seeds a Damaged Eye

(Science Daily) Researchers trying to restore vision damaged by disease have found promise in a tiny implant that sows seeds of new cells in the eye…

In a mouse model that received the implant, progenitor cells were taking on the form of mature photoreceptors and expressed mature photoreceptor markers 14 days after implantation.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]

Burning Heart Tissue Beats Atrial Fibrillation

(HealthDay News) When drug therapy can't control the dangerous heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, burning out the cardiac tissue responsible for the abnormality will do the job in most cases, a new study has found.

Read more.

[Click the title, above, to post a comment.]