A community for people who want to remain as healthy as possible as we age.

It's Not All In Your Head: … Placebo-induced Pain Control

(Science Daily) A new study reveals that when it comes to pain control, the "placebo effect" involves evolutionarily old pain control pathways in the human brainstem, the part of the brain that is continuous with the spinal cord. The research … provides fascinating mechanistic insight into how and why simply expecting that a treatment will reduce pain can act as an effective analgesic.

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Community: I’ve been wondering when scientists would start studying the placebo effect. Now that they understand something about how it works, we need to learn how to corral it and use it.

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Viagra and Its Ilk Aren’t the Only Treatments Around

(New York Times) In many of cases, E.D. is the sign of an underlying disorder like diabetes or hypertension. In fact, in younger men, erection problems are often the first symptom of cardiovascular disease…

That’s because plaque will start to clog the small arteries in the penis before the wider coronary arteries…

In a recent study of men with E.D., or at risk for developing it, researchers in Italy found that the men could improve their erections by losing weight, improving their diet and exercising more frequently. After two years of significant lifestyle changes, 58 percent of the men had normal erectile function, according to the study.

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More Nutrition Information Systems Hit the Shelves—Do They Work?

(Katherine Hobson, U.S. News & World Report) [T]here's a [new nutritional information] system rolling out this fall, and rather than on shelf tags, you can find it right on the packaging of foods manufactured by PepsiCo, Kellogg Co., Unilever, Kraft Foods, and other companies. The Smart Choices program puts a green check on the front of products produced by participating manufacturers as long as the foods meet certain nutritional standards. (It also shows calories and serving size.) The program replaces the individual guidance systems that some companies had used… So should you start making your purchasing decisions based solely on that check?

In a word: no. There are pros and cons to Smart Choices, as there are with other food labeling systems, and unfortunately, you aren't going to be able to abandon skepticism and critical thinking when you walk through those automatic supermarket doors. The big caveat is that while the new program's nutritional standards are "derived from" the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (the government's pronouncement every five years on what foods and nutrients we should be consuming) and authoritative nutrition research, the recommended products aren't uniformly healthful. Cereals are a leading example. While foods in most product categories cannot qualify for a check if more than 25 percent of their calories come as added sugars, an exception was made for cereals, which can contain as many as 12 grams of sugar per serving. That allows for the inclusion of Froot Loops, Frosted Flakes, and Cookie Crunch, all of which clock in at roughly 40 percent sugar.

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Whole Grains, Bran May Fight Hypertension in Men

(HealthDay News) Men, want to keep high blood pressure at bay? Try reaching for whole grains.

That's the message from a Harvard study that found that whole grain foods and foods high in bran bring a boost to heart health. Although this study is among men, data from the Women's Health Study found similar results, the researchers say.

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Meat, Dairy Won't Up Odds for Breast Cancer

(HealthDay News) An adult woman's intake of meat, eggs and dairy products should not boost her risk for breast cancer, new research shows…

A second new study didn't find that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) -- found in dairy products and in meat such as beef -- provided any protective effect again breast cancer, as some experts had suggested. It did not raise the risk, either.

"So far, we haven't seen a strong link between meat intake and fat intake in adulthood and breast cancer in adulthood," concluded Dr. Eleni Linos, MD…

But, she cautioned, "women should probably try to reduce their red meat intake to prevent cardiovascular disease."

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Soluble Fiber, But Not Bran, Soothes Irritable Bowel

(HealthDay News) People with the chronic condition known as irritable bowel syndrome may find relief by consuming soluble fiber (psyllium).

But they'll get no relief -- and perhaps more bowel upset -- from bran, a new Dutch study found.

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For Tomatoes, Green Is the New Red

(Well, New York Times) Ripe, red tomatoes have gone missing in much of the Northeast this summer. A devastating outbreak of late blight fungus has swept through crops and gardens…

While blight can affect tomatoes at any stage, some gardeners are pulling their plants early and are left with green tomatoes still on the vine. This week, Recipes for Health author Martha Rose Shulman offers five new recipes for cooking up green tomatoes.

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Community: I wondered why the price of tomatoes never came down this summer. Click the “Read more” link for the green tomato recipes.

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Saving teeth via root canal not advised

(UPI) Patients should forgo prolonged dental heroics -- root canals -- and replace bad teeth with dental implants, dentists say.

[A] recent study published in the Journal of Oral Implantology showed single-tooth dental implants are 98.5 percent successful after seven years, while the American Academy of General Dentistry found first-time root canals fail 5 percent of the time and at much higher rates in repeat procedures.

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Ankle Circulation Could Warn of Future Strokes

(HealthDay News) A simple test of blood circulation in the ankle could help doctors identify patients at high risk of suffering another stroke, researchers say.

The test compares blood flow in the ankle to that in the arm. A significant difference between the two readings could suggest that a patient suffers from peripheral artery disease, caused by fatty plaque buildup in the arteries of the extremities, the researchers explained in a news release from the American Heart Association.

Stroke survivors and those who have experienced transient ischemic attacks -- also known as TIAs or mini-strokes -- are at high risk of stroke if they have peripheral artery disease, the study authors noted.

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Studies tipping toward surgery to prevent strokes

(Reuters) Surgery may be a better way to clear blockages in neck arteries and prevent strokes than less invasive treatment such as angioplasty, European researchers reported on Friday…

[W]ith surgery, … doctors cut open the neck, scrape away the fatty deposits in the artery, and sew it back up.

After five years, 31 percent of those who got angioplasty had serious restenosis, or reclogging of the artery, compared with 10 percent of those who had surgery. Those who got a stent instead of just angioplasty were half as likely to have their arteries clog up again.

People with severe restenosis a year after treatment were more than twice as likely to have a stroke or transient ischemic attack -- a mini-stroke that resolves on its own -- within five years compared with those with no restenosis.

Read more.

Community: Surely there’s a way to scrape using a tool inserted inside the artery. Scooping up only the scraped material would be a challenge.

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Colon Cancer Stopped in Its Tracks in Swiss Study

(HealthDay News) Swiss scientists report that they may have found a way to stop colon cancer in its tracks by tinkering with a genetic pathway that allows cells to communicate with one another.

The treatment potentially could help prevent colon cancer from reaching advanced stages and moving to other organs.

The research … showed that blocking a communications pathway known as Hedgehog-GLI (HH-GLI) could block tumors because they rely on the pathway to grow.

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Tick saliva could hold cancer cure: Brazilian scientists

(AFP) It may be one of nature's repulsive little blood-sucking parasites, but the humble tick could yield a future cure for cancers of the skin, liver and pancreas, Brazilian researchers have discovered.

They have identified a protein in the saliva of a common South American tick, Amblyomma cajennense, that apparently reduces and can even eradicate cancerous cells while leaving healthy cells alone.

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Scientists Construct 'Off Switch' For Parkinson Therapy

(Science Daily) A common antibiotic can function as an "off switch" for a gene therapy being developed for Parkinson's disease…

Meanwhile, in a review of Parkinson treatments, the researchers say that prior experimental attempts using growth factors — naturally occurring substances that cause cells to grow and divide — to rescue dying brain cells may have failed because they occurred too late in the course of the disease.

Together, the findings suggest that gene therapy to enable the brain to retain its ability to produce dopamine, a neurotransmitter that falls in critically short supply in Parkinson's patients, could be safely attempted during earlier stages of the disease with an added likelihood of success.

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Brain May Use Its 'Mind's Eye' to Control Chaos

(HealthDay News) When you're searching for a friend in a crowd, it appears that your "mind's eye" acts like a spotlight to scan the scene in front of you until you find the right person…

The findings could help improve understanding and treatment of attention-deficit disorder or could lead to ways to increase the rate of cognition in the brain, according to the researchers.

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How Bad Feelings Can Harm Your Health

(HealthDay News) A depressed emotional state -- feelings of hopelessness and apathy -- could have a direct effect on your physical health, new research indicates.

A study of stroke survivors found a slower rate of recovery among those experiencing apathy, caring little about themselves and the world around them. And a study of healthy middle-aged women found an association between hopelessness and unexpected thickening of the carotid artery, the main blood vessel to the brain…

"This doesn't necessarily mean that hopelessness had a direct physical effect, since it could be operating through mechanisms we didn't measure," Everson-Rose said.

But there is a clinical message, she said: "Physicians should tell patients that emotional states can have a physical effect, and that they should seek appropriate treatment for them. Psychiatric treatment for severe depression and hopelessness is warranted."

Read more.

Community: Once again, we run into an association that’s assumed to be causative. Notice that the researcher, as quoted here, didn’t say that bad feelings cause bad health, but that’s what the article writer assumed. It’s at least possible both the bad feelings and the bad health are caused by some third factor. The same caution applies to the writeups of the research finding optimistic women to be in better health than other women. What if some third factor is responsible for both their optimism and their better health?

On the other hand, it seems pretty clear that anger causes heart disease.

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Imaging Sheds Light on How Acupuncture Works

(HealthDay News) Traditional Chinese acupuncture, increasingly popular in the West for a variety of ills, eases pain by regulating key receptors in the brain, according to a new study.

The study showed that acupuncture increases the binding availability of mu-opioid receptors in regions of the brain that process and weaken pain signals -- specifically the cingulate, insula, caudate, thalamus and amygdala. By directly stimulating these chemicals, acupuncture can affect the brain's long-term ability to regulate pain, the study found.

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Get More of This Mineral to Prevent Cancer

(RealAge.com) A study shows that one of the major selling points of dairy products -- calcium -- is associated with a lower incidence of digestive-system cancers…

Researchers suspect that not only calcium but also the vitamin D and conjugated linoleic acid in dairy may have anticarcinogenic effects. Calcium’s claim to anticancer fame may have to do specifically with the fact that calcium binds to bile and fatty acids, reducing the damage these baddies do to the digestive tract. Watch this video on ways to boost your calcium.

Lactose intolerant or don’t like dairy? No problem. Calcium supplements also appear to help cut cancer risk.

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Prostate cancer diagnosed earlier, race gap narrows

(Reuters Health) Men with prostate cancer are being diagnosed at a younger age and earlier stage today than in years past, and the racial disparity in stage at diagnosis has decreased significantly, researchers report.

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BreadBowl pastas on 'food porn' list

(UPI) Officials of a U.S. food advocacy group are calling Domino Pizza's 1,300- to 1,500-calorie BreadBowl Pastas "food porn."

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3 Ways to Beat Your Cravings

(On Fitness, U.S. News & World Report) Debra Zellner, a psychologist at Montclair State University in New Jersey, offered three tips on how to avoid developing specific, intense cravings for sweet foods. (The tips are based on research in animals and humans and in addiction in general, she says.)

1. Don't habitually eat your favorite sweet at the same time of day, in the same mood, or in the same place… [Doing so] sets up a series of cues that will bring on a craving whenever you're in that situation.

2. It may sound paradoxical, but don't eat your favorite treat when you're hungry. Research shows that we're more likely to crave a food when we come to associate it with fulfilling hunger…

3. Don't make the object of your desire taboo. Forbidding yourself to have [it] at all, or allowing it only on very special occasions, may make you more likely to binge when presented with an opportunity.

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Community: One of the most difficult things about quitting smoking, for me, was forgoing the first coffee and cigarette of the morning.

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New fat-fighting drug has anti-diabetes action too

(Reuters) - Researchers searching for a cure for obesity said on Thursday they have developed a drug that not only makes mice lose weight, but reverses diabetes and lowers their cholesterol, too.

The drug, which they have dubbed fatostatin, stops the body from making fat, instead releasing the energy from food. They hope it may lead to a pill that would fight obesity, diabetes and cholesterol, all at once.

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Community: Well, I’m not waiting for a drug that may end up having significant side effects.

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Strong Thighs May Mean Less Knee Pain for Women

(HealthDay News) Stronger thigh muscles can help protect women, but not men, from the pain of arthritic knees, a new study finds.

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Teetotalers More Likely To Be Depressed Than Moderate Drinkers

(Science Daily) When it comes to alcohol consumption and depression, a new study by a team of Norwegian and British researchers shows that heavy drinkers – but also teetotalers -- have higher levels of depression and anxiety than those who drink moderately…

The researchers found that even when they removed people from their study who had quit drinking because of problems with alcohol, the general findings held true: heavy drinkers and non-drinkers were more likely to be anxious and depressed than those who drink moderately…

The happiest people, in contrast, were those who averaged about two glasses of alcohol per week.

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Cigarettes May Dull Taste Buds

(HealthDay News) In addition to the many well-known ways that smoking cigarettes can damage a person's health, new research has found that smoking dampens the ability to taste.

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Get Ready for Gruesome Cigarette Warnings

(HealthDay News) Would a gruesome picture of a cancer-ravaged mouth with rotting teeth make you think twice about buying a pack of cigarettes?

That's the goal of new federal regulations expected to go into effect within three years. The rules will require tobacco companies to cover at least half of the front and back of packages with graphic -- and possibly gruesome -- images illustrating the dangers of smoking.

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Tip of the Week: One Day At A Time

(Shrink Yourself) Do you get overwhelmed by the amount of weight you have to lose? Do you feel doomed to diet for the rest of your life? If you're longing for a day when you don't have to think about food or the number on the scale, this week's tip is for you..

The day you're looking forward to is today. You don't have to diet forever, you just need to make a new and different choice today. You don't have to lose 10, 20 or 50 pounds today, you just have to go out for a walk. Often times facing the big picture scares us into paralysis. If that has happened to you in the past, don't let it happen anymore. Anyone can do something for one day. Just for today: eat well. Just for today: exercise. Just for today: try a new way. It's just one day.

Source.

Community: It’s how recovering alcoholics and addicts do it.

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What Is Normal Eating?

(Margarita Tatakovsky, M.S., PsychCentral) Today, the definition of normal eating is blurry. It’s gotten lost amid buzz words like “diet,” “restriction,” “willpower” and “flat abs.” It’s sandwiched between the sizable stacks of “shoulds”: I should diet. I should abstain from dessert. I should count calories. I should avoid “bad” foods. I should have an invisible stomach, smaller hips and thin thighs.

While reading Purge: Rehab Diaries … by Nicole Johns, about the author’s experiences in an eating disorder center, I came across the following definition of normal eating. It was created by Ellyn Satter, an expert on eating and feeding. Satter writes:

“Normal eating is going to the table hungry and eating until you are satisfied. It is being able to choose food you like and eat it and truly get enough of it—not just stop eating because you think you should. Normal eating is being able to give some thought to your food selection so you get nutritious food, but not being so wary and restrictive that you miss out on enjoyable food. Normal eating is giving yourself permission to eat sometimes because you are happy, sad or bored, or just because it feels good. Normal eating is mostly three meals a day, or four or five, or it can be choosing to munch along the way. It is leaving some cookies on the plate because you know you can have some again tomorrow, or it is eating more now because they taste so wonderful. Normal eating is overeating at times, feeling stuffed and uncomfortable. And it can be undereating at times and wishing you had more. Normal eating is trusting your body to make up for your mistakes in eating. Normal eating takes up some of your time and attention, but keeps its place as only one important area of your life.

In short, normal eating is flexible. It varies in response to your hunger, your schedule, your proximity to food and your feelings.”

Read more.

Community: I’ve mentioned before Paul McKenna’s “I Can Make You Thin” program (videos of his series on TLC are available here). Here are the basics:

  • When you’re hungry, eat.
  • Eat what you want.
  • Eat mindfully.
  • Stop when you’re full.

It’s the most sensible advice I’ve ever received about eating.

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Attention, Walkers: How to Ease Into Running

(Health.com) Ease into running—and double your calorie burn—with this streamlined plan.

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Community: I tried running some years ago, and I hated it. I didn’t want to get out of bed in the morning. One day, as I was running, I noticed how strained all the other runners looked, and how happy all the walkers looked. That’s when I started walking, and started enjoying getting up and out in the morning. It’s important for me to be doing something I enjoy, so that I’ll do it consistently.

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Bigger butt may mean fewer hip fractures

(UPI) A major decline in the proportion of Canadians suffering hip fractures may be partly due to people weighing more and having bigger buttocks, researchers say.

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Community: So extra fat is good for something? I think I’ll continue to fight it, anyway.

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Kudzu may help prevent heart disease

(UPI) [Researchers] report root extracts from kudzu show promise as a dietary supplement for metabolic syndrome -- found in people with obesity, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and problems with their body's ability to use insulin. Metabolic syndrome means a high risk for heart attacks, strokes and other diseases.

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Small Peptide Found To Stop Lung Cancer Tumor Growth In Mice

(Science Daily) In new animal research done by investigators at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, scientists have discovered a treatment effective in mice at blocking the growth and shrinking the size of lung cancer tumors, one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world.

The study, recently published inMolecular Cancer Therapeutics, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, is the first to show that treatment with a specific peptide, angiotensin-(1-7), reduces lung tumor growth by inhibiting blood vessel formation.

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Unlocking The Body's Defenses Against Cancer

(Science Daily) Scientists have discovered a way of allowing healthy cells to take charge of cancerous cells and stop them developing into tumours in what could provide a new approach to treating early-stage cancers.

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Gene 'Fix' in Egg Prevents Inherited Diseases in Monkeys

(HealthDay News) A genetic tweak of the unfertilized eggs of macaque monkeys effectively prevented the transmission of diseases typically passed down through the maternal line, U.S. scientists reported.

The hope is that the method could prevent inherited diseases passed from human mothers to their children through mutated DNA in cell "power plants" called mitochondria…

Dr. Joshua Hare … called the work "very exciting."…

"This addresses an important problem and I think it could be applicable in humans," Hare said. "It will be very controversial for awhile," he said. "It could be close enough to cloning to worry people. It will be interesting to see what happens in terms of whether or not this is attempted in a human being."

Dr. Jamie Grifo…, who has done similar experiments in mice, agreed that ethical issues will continue to plague this work.

"This kind of work is going to cause people to be nervous and regulators to be really nervous," Grifo said, while defending the research. "Show me the harm," he said. "If you can make healthy babies, what is the harm?"

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Community: In vitro fertilization was once controversial, too. Now, it’s fairly routine.

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Fertilizer Ban Makes a Difference

(HealthDay News) Banning or restricting the use of certain types of lawn fertilizers can improve water quality in nearby lakes and streams, new research shows.

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Heat Stress In Older People And People With Chronic Diseases

(Science Daily) People over the age of 60 are the most vulnerable to heat waves, with 82% to 92% more deaths than average occurring in this age group. Risks for heat-related illness or injury – such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat cramps – are also heightened in people with obesity, heart disease, diabetes and respiratory conditions as these decrease the body's ability to adapt to temperature changes…

Physicians – and their patients – must be aware of the risk factors for older people and people with chronic disease in excessive heat conditions and counsel and manage accordingly.

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Smart Clothes For Better Healthcare

(Science Daily) Comfortable smart clothes that monitor the wearer’s heart, breathing and body temperature promise to revolutionise healthcare by reducing hospital visits and allowing patients to lead more active lives.

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As Waistlines Widen, Brains Shrink

(HealthDay News) For every excess pound piled on the body, the brain gets a little bit smaller.

That's the message from new research that found that elderly individuals who were obese or overweight had significantly less brain tissue than individuals of normal weight.

"The brains of obese people looked 16 years older than their healthy counterparts while [those of] overweight people looked 8 years older," said UCLA neuroscientist Paul Thompson, senior author of a study…

Much of the lost tissue was in the frontal and temporal lobe regions of the brain, the seat of decision-making and memory, among other things.

The findings could have serious implications for aging, overweight or obese individuals, including a heightened risk of Alzheimer's, the researchers said.

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Daylight Could Help Control Our Weight

(Science Daily) Exciting research into Brown adipose tissue (BAT) — brown fat, which is found in abundance in hibernating animals and newborn babies — could lead to new ways of preventing obesity.

Studies have already shown that BAT activity in adults is reduced with obesity. Therefore, promoting BAT function could prevent or reduce obesity in some people.

New research … has shown — for the first time — that daylight is a major factor in controlling BAT activity.

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Link Between Erectile Dysfunction And Obesity Explored

(Science Daily) Obese men are at increased risk for erectile dysfunction (ED), likely caused by atherosclerosis-related hypertension and cardiovascular disease, as well as hormonal changes associated with obesity.

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Fat In The Liver -- Not The Belly -- May Be A Better Marker For Disease Risk (Science Daily) "Data from a large number of studies shows that visceral

Fat In The Liver -- Not The Belly -- May Be A Better Marker For Disease Risk

(Science Daily) "Data from a large number of studies shows that visceral fat is associated with metabolic risk, which has led to the belief that visceral fat might even cause metabolic dysfunction," says senior investigator Samuel Klein, M.D. "However, visceral fat tracks closely with liver fat. We have found that excess fat in the liver, not visceral fat, is a key marker of metabolic dysfunction. Visceral fat might simply be an innocent bystander that is associated with liver fat."

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Why You Should Think Twice Before Using Alli or Other Weight Loss Aids

(Deborah Kotz, On Women, U.S. News & World Report) [T]he FDA announced an investigation into reports of liver problems thought to be related to an over-the-counter weight loss pill, Alli, and the prescription version, Xenical…

[The] take-home message is that we can't assume that any weight-loss medication is risk free. Those who are severely overweight might find that the weight-loss benefits of orlistat are greater than its risks, but those with just a few pounds to lose may want to think twice, given what may be a small possibility of liver damage. (Alli and Xenical already have some nasty side effects like diarrhea and fecal incontinence if used incorrectly.) And unapproved drugs or weight-loss supplements should definitely be avoided altogether; those herbal weight-loss concoctions sold on the Internet may have harmful prescription drugs hidden in them. As tempting as these products may seem, they're certainly not worth the price of good health.

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The Claim: Some Foods Can Ease Arthritis Pain

(New York Times) In one of the largest analyses of diet and various types of arthritis, researchers looked at data on more than 800 patients from 15 studies. They examined several diets popular among arthritis patients and found that the one that had the greatest effect was a Mediterranean-type diet emphasizing foods like fruits, vegetables, grains, fish and olive oil, while limiting red meat. In 12 weeks, people on the diet reported about 15 percent less pain, but no improvement in physical function or morning stiffness. A vegetarian diet that allowed eggs and dairy products had a similar effect.

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Community: The Mediterranean diet just keeps looking better and better.

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Immune System's Role In Bone Loss Uncovered; Finding Could Lead To New Therapies For Osteoporosis

(Science Daily) Got high cholesterol? You might want to consider a bone density test.

A new UCLA study sheds light on the link between high cholesterol and osteoporosis and identifies a new way that the body's immune cells play a role in bone loss.

Published Aug. 20 in the journalClinical Immunology, the research could lead to new immune-based approaches for treating osteoporosis. Affecting 10 million Americans, the disease causes fragile bones and increases the risk of fractures, resulting in lost independence and mobility.

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Acupuncture May Bring Relief For Common Condition In Women, Study Suggests

(Science Daily) Polycystic ovary syndrome, a common condition among women, can be relieved by the use of acupuncture and exercise…

The study showed that activity in the sympathetic nervous system was lower in the women who received acupuncture and in those who took regular exercise than it was in the control group. The acupuncture treatment brought further benefits.

“Those who received acupuncture found that their menstruation became more normal. We could also see that their levels of testosterone became significantly lower, and this is an important observation, since elevated testosterone levels are closely connected with the increased activity in the sympathetic nervous system of women,” says Elisabet Stener‑Victorin.

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Two Million Expected To Die Each Year From Tobacco-induced Cancers By 2015

(Science Daily)The Tobacco Atlas, Third Edition, published by the American Cancer Society and World Lung Foundation, estimates that tobacco use kills some six million people each year- more than a third of whom will die from cancer- and drains US$500 billion annually from global economies…

Unique among cancer-causing agents, the danger of tobacco is completely preventable through proven public policies. Major measures include tobacco taxes, advertising bans, smokefree public places, and effective health warnings on packages.

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Saliva May Help Spot Oral Cancer Early

(HealthDay News) In a major step towards early diagnosis of oral cancer, researchers have found that saliva contains at least 50 microRNAs that could aid detection.

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Hormone Therapy for Early Prostate Cancer Not Always Best

(HealthDay News) Men who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer and who also have underlying heart disease may not benefit from treatment with hormones, new research suggests.

In fact, such hormone therapy may actually increase their odds of dying.

"For men who've had a prior heart attack or heart failure, use of hormone therapy for prostate cancer was associated with a shortened lifespan," said study author Dr. Akash Nanda.

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Women More Prone to Die in Month After Heart Attack

(HealthDay News) Women are more likely to die than men in the 30 days after a heart attack, but that doesn't mean gender is driving the trend, a new study finds.

Rather, "the difference can be attributed to well-known clinical and angiographic characteristics," such as age and the presence of other illnesses, said study lead author Dr. Jeffrey S. Berger…

The study shows that what physicians call comorbidities -- other illnesses -- play a more important role in determining survival in women than in men, said … a member of the research team.

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Study: To grandmother's house we should go

(UPI) Canadian researchers say visiting grandma may help keep toddlers from forming negative age stereotypes about the elderly.

The study, published in Educational Gerontology, suggests toddlers lacking contact with older people may attach negative cultural images -- such as being absent-minded or hard-of-hearing -- to the elderly.

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End-of-Life Advice Not Always Welcome

(HealthDay News) When deciding whether to turn off life support for a loved one, family members aren't always interested in their doctor's advice, new research shows.

The finding runs counter to assumptions among critical-care providers that families making such a heart-wrenching choice would welcome a physician's impartial opinion.

Critically ill patients who don't have advance directives often require others to make medical decisions for them, said study author Douglas B. White…

Family members often make the decision based on what they believe the patient would have wanted.

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